PDA

View Full Version : Coywolf



shunyadragon
03-02-2014, 04:29 AM
Working in the field as a soil scientist and geologist I became interested in native American Canines.

The Coywolf (Eastern Wolf, formerly Canis latrans var.; currently Canis latrans x C. lycaon. genetically very similar to Canis Rufis - Eastern Red Wolf of North Carolina) This is a remarkable intelligent subspecies of the canids (wolf/coyote) adaptation to the Northeastern/eastern USA. The adaptation involves a size intermediate between wolves and coyote, diet of a smaller animals, do not hunt in packs, and a stealth life style that adapts them to urban environments. They can live in urban environments such as New York City, Philadelphia, Boston, and Washington DC, without being noticed or interfering with humans. They are intelligent enough not to be hit by vehicles even though they den around busy highways and streets in wooded interchanges and parks. They are extremely difficult to trap. Except for occasional rare kills do not hunt pets, domestic animals, and domestic dogs appear to be indifferent to their presence. This remarkable recent adaptation to a human environment is good example of evolution in the modern world.

A recent effort to trap a Coywolf that apparently killed a small dog (rarely occurs) failed despite repeated efforts by professional trappers. They found the den with various toys, balls and a doll. The Coywolf apparently moved away in response to the efforts to trap it.

http://www.coywolf.org/coywolf-basic-info/

rogue06
03-02-2014, 03:34 PM
Working in the field as a soil scientist and geologist I became interested in native American Canines.

The Coywolf (Eastern Wolf, formerly Canis latrans var.; currently Canis latrans x C. lycaon. genetically very similar to Canis Rufis - Eastern Red Wolf of North Carolina) This is a remarkable intelligent subspecies of the canids (wolf/coyote) adaptation to the Northeastern/eastern USA. The adaptation involves a size intermediate between wolves and coyote, diet of a smaller animals, do not hunt in packs, and a stealth life style that adapts them to urban environments. They can live in urban environments such as New York City, Philadelphia, Boston, and Washington DC, without being noticed or interfering with humans. They are intelligent enough not to be hit by vehicles even though they den around busy highways and streets in wooded interchanges and parks. They are extremely difficult to trap. Except for occasional rare kills do not hunt pets, domestic animals, and domestic dogs appear to be indifferent to their presence. This remarkable recent adaptation to a human environment is good example of evolution in the modern world.

A recent effort to trap a Coywolf that apparently killed a small dog (rarely occurs) failed despite repeated efforts by professional trappers. They found the den with various toys, balls and a doll. The Coywolf apparently moved away in response to the efforts to trap it.

http://www.coywolf.org/coywolf-basic-info/
Thanks to hunting and deforestation in the eastern portion of North America the native wolf population was driven to near extinction. This allowed the smaller but more versatile coyotes to start moving into the area. Apparently the two canines can breed and the result of this was that a hybrid starting to appear that was part coyote and part wolf that has wolf's tendency towards pack hunting and predation and the coyote's lack of fear of human-developed areas.

Genetic tests reveal that the new species known as the coywolf or eastern coyote has a majority of coyote ancestry and is thriving in the Northeast. The rest comes from the gray wolf, though occasionally red wolf, and even a bit of dog genes.

The same thing appears to be starting to happen in northern Mexico (the first coywolf in the northeastern part of North America was identified in 1918) and may even be behind some of the reports of chupacabras.


http://www-tc.pbs.org/wnet/nature/files/2014/01/nature.coyowolf.v5.png


Genetic Characterization of Eastern Coyotes in Eastern Massachusetts (http://www.easterncoyoteresearch.com/downloads/GeneticsOfEasternCoywolfFinalInPrint.pdf) Pdf

shunyadragon
03-02-2014, 04:16 PM
There are some distinctive features from what I have read. They do not hunt in large packs the way wolves do, but are more opportunistic hunters solo or in small groups for smaller game. It is odd that they are hardly noticed by domestic dogs, and for the most part do not prey on domesticated animals. These factors contribute to their ability to adapt in urban environments and live a stealth life style.

Despite the statement in the reference I believe from my sources they are not often hit by vehicles. They tracked several tagged wolves living in an interchange woodland and found they could effectively avoid vehicles.