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View Full Version : Solid State Drives may become 10x faster



mikewhitney
07-22-2016, 10:45 AM
http://www.pcworld.com/article/3098769/storage/intel-experiments-with-3d-xpoint-as-it-ships-out-ssds-to-testers.html


Intel’s groundbreaking 3D Xpoint technology is poised to shake up computer memory and storage with its blazing fast speed and high capacity, but the chipmaker is still trying to figure out the best fits for the technology.

3D Xpoint, developed by Intel and Micron, is a new class of memory and storage that can be faster, denser, and more durable than conventional DRAM and flash storage.

Intel claims 3D Xpoint is 10 times denser than memory, and the company has shown it to be up to 10 times faster than conventional SSDs.

Cow Poke
07-22-2016, 10:50 AM
Interesting... but I wonder if, in normal use, '10X' is even perceptible. My 1T SSD in my laptop is downright instantaneous, so... wondering if I would even notice an improvement.

You GAMERS, though, will be jumping up and down! :tongue:

Sparko
07-22-2016, 10:50 AM
Positronic brains!

mikewhitney
07-22-2016, 10:57 AM
The technology is described at :
www.micron.com/about/emerging-technologies/3d-xpoint-technology (https://www.micron.com/about/emerging-technologies/3d-xpoint-technology)

There is another technology which is from the same guy/group that gave us the 3D transistor concept.
http://www.eetasia.com/news/article/besang-slashes-3d-nand-flash-cost-at-2-cents-per-gb (http://www.eetasia.com/news/article/besang-slashes-3d-nand-flash-cost-at-2-cents-per-gb?utm_source=News%20Blast&utm_medium=Article%20Alert&utm_campaign=20160721)
(but I don't know if this link works directly for you all)


BeSang Inc, the inventor of 3D monolithic chip technology back in 2010, claims to have since created a superior three-dimensional (3D) architecture for NAND flash. Frustrated with licensee Hynix's slow implementation of its monolithic 3D technology, BeSang is opening the door to partnerships with other memory houses, as well as offering to contract-fab the chips for resale by others, at a price that reduces the cost-per-bit of 3D NAND from over 20¢ to about 2¢ per gigabyte. Problems with conventional 3D NAND are discussed including cell size, vertical scaling limitation, inefficiency of product architecture, and how BeSang aims to remedy them.

And this is the video link from that site:

www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=55&v=BPGmZ0VplKs

mikewhitney
07-22-2016, 11:12 AM
Interesting... but I wonder if, in normal use, '10X' is even perceptible. My 1T SSD in my laptop is downright instantaneous, so... wondering if I would even notice an improvement.

You GAMERS, though, will be jumping up and down! :tongue:

It seems funny that this great advancement is having a hard time finding a market. I suppose the gamers would be a market for higher priced memory just like they buy the $600 video cards.

I wonder what the price will be for this. I know there are DRAMs available as RAM Drives to speed up server computers -- I think as a way to upgrade old systems which have to be sped up.

Sparko
07-22-2016, 11:34 AM
It seems funny that this great advancement is having a hard time finding a market. I suppose the gamers would be a market for higher priced memory just like they buy the $600 video cards.

I wonder what the price will be for this. I know there are DRAMs available as RAM Drives to speed up server computers -- I think as a way to upgrade old systems which have to be sped up.

the advantage is that it is also 10X denser. That means larger capacity in smaller spaces for drives, memory chips, flash drives, etc. all at 10x the speed. That means faster calculations, faster load times, faster execution times. Computers have been pretty much stuck at current speeds for about 10 years now because of moore's law. If at least memory can be sped up, that gives computers a pretty big boost. And if the technology can translate to CPUs then watch out!

Cow Poke
07-22-2016, 12:32 PM
the advantage is that it is also 10X denser.

So, they'll hold more information than my single sided single density 5 1/4" floppy disk?

Sparko
07-22-2016, 12:39 PM
So, they'll hold more information than my single sided single density 5 1/4" floppy disk?yes. amazing world we live in. ain't it? one day we might even be able to have an entire 4-function calculator that fits on our wrists! And telephones that we can carry in a briefcase!

mikewhitney
07-26-2016, 11:09 AM
Listening more to the guy from BeSang... he noted the similarity of gains of BeSang's super NAND design with 3D X Point. Of course the difference is that Intel/Micron are starting to make product -- but even with their announcement it seems odd they are doing it to a test market.

A BeSang video also explained the the 1000x faster behavior only was when used in a dynamic ram styled access but that SSD was only to benefit by a 10x increase with the 3D X Point. Further he mentioned that Intel/Micron has only figured out the technology to two layers (which still is great!) but their projections for greater benefits are envisioned with many more parallel layers. It is this parallel layering which also starts to increase the cost of the build process of such ICs. (The reason for any excitement over the layering process is that it offers some pathway to advance the SSDs which has not been available with the older NAND technology.)

Note that NAND refers to a logic circuit which can be used in making memory storage cells. This logic circuit is a building block originally just used for dynamic activity like microprocessors but now has found a use in storage devices (which preserve the data when powered down).

Also, regarding the idea of replacing the dynamic RAM in a computer with 3D X Point ... This is not practical because the number of write cycles is much less than with Dynamic RAM. So the 3D X Point would have to be used in narrow circumstances where maybe it stores data used in a more static sense. I suppose, for example, the operating system code could be stored in 3D X Point memory since it is often accessed but rarely changed -- this seems like a good option -- it may require a change in the CPU or the operating system to make it happen. One idea for this change would be that the operating system defines (or recognizes) a section of RAM which should be used to load the operating system -- and then load once and for all -- until that code has been modified.