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Teallaura
07-30-2016, 12:43 PM
I literally have had fewer tha ten sunburns in my life but my face has had mild burns the last two Saturdays with only moderate exposure. I didn't think so much of it when I was on the riverfront - most of the times I've burned have been near water. But today I can feel a slight burn and I didn't go out THAT much.

:shrug: Can you become more sensitive as you age?

DesertBerean
07-30-2016, 12:55 PM
:nsm:

Cerebrum123
07-30-2016, 12:57 PM
I literally have had fewer tha ten sunburns in my life but my face has had mild burns the last two Saturdays with only moderate exposure. I didn't think so much of it when I was on the riverfront - most of the times I've burned have been near water. But today I can feel a slight burn and I didn't go out THAT much.

:shrug: Can you become more sensitive as you age?

Yeah, you can. Pretty much any sensitivity can change for a variety of reasons. A more extreme example would be the time my RSD caused me to be unable to go out in sunlight because it was literally painful when it hit my skin. I had to wear a thick paste just to go outside.

Teallaura
07-30-2016, 01:05 PM
Ouch!

Guess I'll be investing in sunscreen...

Cerebrum123
07-30-2016, 01:06 PM
Ouch!

Guess I'll be investing in sunscreen...

Yeah, fortunately I'm not sensitive to sunlight in that manner anymore.

Jedidiah
07-30-2016, 01:07 PM
My way of dealing with sunburn is to sit in the shade and look out at the sun. Work can wait until a cloudy day.

Cow Poke
07-30-2016, 01:59 PM
I literally have had fewer tha ten sunburns in my life but my face has had mild burns the last two Saturdays with only moderate exposure. I didn't think so much of it when I was on the riverfront - most of the times I've burned have been near water. But today I can feel a slight burn and I didn't go out THAT much.

:shrug: Can you become more sensitive as you age?

Yes, your skin dries out and is less resilient.

Cow Poke
07-30-2016, 02:00 PM
The worst sunburn I ever got was a warm spring day in Colorado on the ski slopes. Didn't realize how much sun the snow was reflecting. My face looked like a greasy cheese pizza. :eww:

DesertBerean
07-30-2016, 02:26 PM
Yes...you can burn in snow.

Teallaura
07-30-2016, 02:37 PM
You can burn on a cloudy day, too.

Fortunately, I'm not that sensitive yet.


I'm debating - does a sunburn that lasts only a few hours even count? If so, I'm one shy of 10 for my lifetime average...

Cow Poke
07-30-2016, 02:40 PM
I usually burn pretty bad at the beginning of the summer, then I have a "farmer's tan" the rest of the summer. (Which, in Texas, is not November - February)

Littlejoe
07-30-2016, 03:08 PM
I usually burn pretty bad at the beginning of the summer, then I have a "farmer's tan" the rest of the summer. (Which, in Texas, is not November - February)
The Four Seasons of Texas: December, January, February....SUMMER! :hehe:

mossrose
07-30-2016, 07:51 PM
No sunburn is a good burn. All are bad. Use sunscreen!

:mossy:

Catholicity
08-05-2016, 12:06 AM
I would always use sunscreen. My Favorite is Neutrogena. If you have sensitive skin they make one for that, or use the baby kind. They both work. You're supposed to use roughly one shot glass full for your body and reapply every 3-4 hours if you aren't in the water.

Teallaura
08-05-2016, 06:19 PM
:twitch:


Well, I do the bulk of my move tomorrow so we'll see what happens...

mossrose
08-05-2016, 06:26 PM
Use sunscreen!

:hug:

Teallaura
08-05-2016, 06:37 PM
Not THAT much! I don't wanna star in a greased pig contest!

Catholicity
08-07-2016, 05:37 PM
Not THAT much! I don't wanna star in a greased pig contest!

Just sayin, that's what the CDC says. One shot glass for the whole body. Not the spray on kind either.

Teallaura
08-07-2016, 06:44 PM
Well, I did use sunscreen. :shrug: