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Speedlearner1
03-26-2017, 09:19 PM
What is the difference between exegesis and hermeneutics? I thought both meant some form of interpretation.

robrecht
03-26-2017, 09:29 PM
What is the difference between exegesis and hermeneutics? I thought both meant some form of interpretation.
Both words are very general and can be used in a wide variety of ways, many of them overlapping. Thus without further specification of both words in context, one really cannot differentiate between them.

Adrift
03-26-2017, 10:12 PM
I always saw "hermeneutic" as one's general approach to interpreting scripture, where as "exegesis" is a narrower term which refers to the techniques used to draw the meaning out of the text itself.

37818
03-27-2017, 01:05 PM
Hermeneutics in regards to the Bible has been called the science of Biblical interpretation and would include exegesis. But there is not one hermeneutic. Catholic, Protestant, Evangelical and Baptist to name a few types hermeneutical forms. Now exegesis is interpretation from within the text in question and can be affected by the hermeneutics used, but should not be. Exegesis as opposed to eisegesis, eisegesis which is reading into the text a meaning not actually in or from the text.

NorrinRadd
03-29-2017, 08:47 AM
Hermeneutics in regards to the Bible has been called the science of Biblical interpretation and would include exegesis. But there is not one hermeneutic. Catholic, Protestant, Evangelical and Baptist to name a few types hermeneutical forms. Now exegesis is interpretation from within the text in question and can be affected by the hermeneutics used, but should not be. Exegesis as opposed to eisegesis, eisegesis which is reading into the text a meaning not actually in or from the text.

Yeah... But this is kind of idealized. In reality, it's not possible to strictly isolate exegesis that way. There are cases (only few, certainly) where the actual wording of the underlying original text is in dispute. Theological understanding is one tool used to determine the correct wording. There are more than a few cases where authorship is in dispute. In those cases, the question of which interpretation is most consistent with the overall theology of the putative author has to be considered. In some cases, while the wording is known, multiple translations are possible. Theology and interpretation play a role in determining the correct translation.

37818
03-30-2017, 01:18 PM
Yeah... But this is kind of idealized. In reality, it's not possible to strictly isolate exegesis that way. There are cases (only few, certainly) where the actual wording of the underlying original text is in dispute. Theological understanding is one tool used to determine the correct wording. There are more than a few cases where authorship is in dispute. In those cases, the question of which interpretation is most consistent with the overall theology of the putative author has to be considered. In some cases, while the wording is known, multiple translations are possible. Theology and interpretation play a role in determining the correct translation.

Believers versus unbelievers. Interpretation of the reader [the hermeneutic the reader uses]. Interpretation of the translator[s]. Textual criticism method used. These are indeed issues of the hermeneutic type and method used and can so affect one's exegesis. As I had said, ". . . to name a few."

Speedlearner1
03-31-2017, 07:36 PM
In the book The Paul Quest, Ben Witherington III first says that in ancient times function was assumed to follow form. Then he quotes Sextus Empericus when he brings up the topic of Physiognomics. What does physiognomics have to do with function following form? I hate to admit that I know next to nothing on this topic.