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View Full Version : lifting weights is a moral imperative for every man



Darth Executor
02-13-2018, 03:21 PM
I started working out seriously about a month ago and it's easily one of the best decisions I've made in my life. The biggest turn-off, previously, was that I thought I had to spend hours at the gym every couple of days to see results. In fact, after doing some reading and getting advice from other men in very good shape is that it's actually not that time-consuming at all and you can get a body that is better than 99% of all other men with as little as 30-40 minutes, twice a week. Right now I'm doing 1 hour 3 times a week, but that's because i waste a lot of time between sets. At this point if even an extremely lazy person like me can work it into their routine there's no reason, other than serious physical illness, as to why any man shouldn't work out.

And I've seen some of your pictures on facebook, a lot of you could use some time on the squat rack. Especially if you're fat, lots of muscle = lots of calories being burned passively, which makes it easier to lose weight. You still need to fix your diet, but I've found that increasing muscle to fat ratio ends up with my body demanding more protein in lieu of the sugar my fat cells previously demanded, so it even makes eating better easier for you.

Also, I recommend 5g (a teaspoon) of Creatine once a day when you do start working out. It's a well researched supplement that aids in building muscles (and improves concentration as a side-effect) with no bad side effects.

You don't even have to do cardio, but if you do 15 minutes of alternating between maximum intensity and a low pace is enough. too much cardio is detrimental, actually.

KingsGambit
02-13-2018, 03:34 PM
Anybody can lift weights regardless of their current shape. It was literally all I did when I had a gym membership.

Littlejoe
02-13-2018, 03:45 PM
I had a gym membership for about a year and worked out there 2 - 4 times a week. I had very little success with muscle growth (hypertrophy) but I did lose weight and tone up. I have dropped my membership now but I still work out 3 - 6 times a week. I walk a mile + and somewhere between 10 and 15 flights of stairs 2 -3 times a week and I do 4 - 5 sets of 15 pushups (I'm trying to do one armed but I still need help from the other arm) and 4 sets of 10 pullups 2 -3 times per week. According to what I can find, that will get you along way down the fitness road and it costs next to nothing.

Darth Executor
02-13-2018, 03:49 PM
try creatine and maybe have your doctor check your testosterone levels. I have no idea what it's like without creatine but even with less than 4 weeks of working out my biceps/triceps are noticeably thicker.

Littlejoe
02-13-2018, 03:52 PM
Actually I just started Testosterone therapy. It was incredibly low.

ETA: I still have left over creatine. I used to make a shake before every work out but it didn't help. And I have a body that does not grow muscle easily. I increased my strength by quite a bit, but did not have significant muscle growth.

Darth Executor
02-13-2018, 04:35 PM
what cardio does to you:

https://nypost.com/2016/10/03/marathon-training-made-me-fat/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=site%20buttons&utm_campaign=site%20buttons


When Jacqueline Elbaz laced up to train for her first marathon, she assumed amping up her running routine would help her shed pounds.

But when Elbaz, who works in fashion, crossed the finish line at the 2014 New York City Marathon, she was 15 pounds heavier than when she’d started training four months prior.

...

“People are overestimating how many calories they’re burning over the run, and as a result they’re consuming too much,” Yang says. It’s a mistake any exerciser can make, whether they’re training for a marathon or getting back to the gym after a hiatus.

26474

The problem with excessive cardio is that it makes you hungry while providing very little calorie consumption. Muscles increase your metabolic rate even when you're not working out because they're very energy hungry. Simply being SWOLE makes you burn more fat.

Low intensity cardio OTOH just eats up energy while you're doing it, and makes you hungry, at which point you'll probably eat more than you used up.\

Couple of weeks ago I bought and ate an entire roast chicken after a workout. I noticed absolutely no weight increase (my diet is still pretty terrible otherwise), because it wasn't a lot of carbs, some of the protein went to building muscles and my metabolism is generally faster than it was before that.

One Bad Pig
02-13-2018, 06:18 PM
Anybody can lift weights regardless of their current shape. It was literally all I did when I had a gym membership.
Well, I can't. Having an aneurism sucks. About all I can do is low-intensity cardio.

Sparko
02-14-2018, 05:46 AM
Yeah this is the same conclusion I have come to: I can't lose weight doing cardio. I just wear myself out and eat more. I lost a lot of muscle mass over the last few years and replaced it with fat. Aging sucks. I am going to start weight training. I am waiting for a gym to open up in the building where I work and hoping to join there to do some weight training after work. There are no other gyms close by me. I wish they would hurry up and open this one up.

Darth Executor
02-14-2018, 08:08 AM
Well, I can't. Having an aneurism sucks. About all I can do is low-intensity cardio.

Surgery not an option?

Darth Executor
02-14-2018, 08:11 AM
Yeah this is the same conclusion I have come to: I can't lose weight doing cardio. I just wear myself out and eat more. I lost a lot of muscle mass over the last few years and replaced it with fat. Aging sucks. I am going to start weight training. I am waiting for a gym to open up in the building where I work and hoping to join there to do some weight training after work. There are no other gyms close by me. I wish they would hurry up and open this one up.

you can't really lose weight just with exercise anyway, if your diet is bad you will still have a thick layer of lard over the muscle. the muscles just makes it easier.

Sparko
02-14-2018, 08:31 AM
you can't really lose weight just with exercise anyway, if your diet is bad you will still have a thick layer of lard over the muscle. the muscles just makes it easier.

I need the extra calorie burning of more muscle mass. I try to eat well but my lifestyle is pretty sedentary. I tried walking and stationary bike but that just bored me and did nothing for my weight. I can stand to do 15 or 20 minutes of weights a couple of times a week, but peddling for 30 minutes 3 times a week is torture physically and mentally.

One Bad Pig
02-14-2018, 09:47 AM
Surgery not an option?
It's right above my heart. If it gets too large, it will have to be surgically replaced. I don't consider what is essentially open-heart surgery to be elective, however; assuming I survive the surgery, potential post-surgical complications include strokes.

Zymologist
02-14-2018, 11:54 AM
I really don't like being in the gym, so I lift in my basement. Sometimes I will also "exercise with the kids," which is basically me doing either pushups with them on my back or squats with them in my arms. It's amazing how fast that will wipe me out. I figure it's good bonding time (they have a blast), and if I do it consistently I have a built-in system of gains.

If I'm not doing it with the kids then I focus on the big stuff: deadlifts, bench press and barbell row (I typically alternate these two on the same day), and squats.

Bill the Cat
02-14-2018, 12:10 PM
Creatine is awful for your liver.

Bill the Cat
02-14-2018, 12:11 PM
I need the extra calorie burning of more muscle mass. I try to eat well but my lifestyle is pretty sedentary. I tried walking and stationary bike but that just bored me and did nothing for my weight. I can stand to do 15 or 20 minutes of weights a couple of times a week, but peddling for 30 minutes 3 times a week is torture physically and mentally.

I walk on the treadmill while watching my tv shows. Passes the time pretty good.

Darth Executor
02-14-2018, 12:15 PM
Creatine is awful for your liver.

There's no evidence of that afaik. It's one of the knocks against it (along with accelerating male pattern baldness) that as far as I've read has no basis in any real evidence. Creatine is pretty well studied so there is evidence of the opposite. IE:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12500988


Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of long-term Cr supplementation on blood parameters reflecting liver and kidney function. Twenty-three members of an NCAA Division II American football team (ages = 19-24 years) with at least 2 years of strength training experience were divided into a Cr monohydrate group (CrM, n = 10) in which they voluntarily and spontaneously ingested creatine, and a control group (n = 13) in which they took no supplements. Individuals in the CrM group averaged regular daily consumption of 5 to 20 g (mean SD = 13.9 5.8 g) for 0.25 to 5.6 years (2.9 1.8 years). Venous blood analysis for serum albumin, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, bilirubin, urea, and creatinine produced no significant differences between groups. Creatinine clearance was estimated from serum creatinine and was not significantly different between groups. Within the CrM group, correlations between all blood parameters and either daily dosage or duration of supplementation were nonsignificant. Therefore, it appears that oral supplementation with CrM has no long-term detrimental effects on kidney or liver functions in highly trained college athletes in the absence of other nutritional supplements.