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Zymologist
03-29-2018, 10:04 AM
For people who are familiar with this: what would you say it means to be "on the spectrum?"

I think the simple answer would be "they see the world differently," and maybe that's all that can be said in a general sense (as in, maybe there's such a wide range of autistic people that it can't be generalized further). I'm wondering if any other generally accurate statements could be made.

Bill the Cat
03-29-2018, 10:12 AM
I think it has to do with the way you process stimuli differently from the norm. My son is on the spectrum, and he has problems with lack of empathy and with being laser focused on a task. He processes those stimuli differently from how I do.

mikewhitney
03-29-2018, 10:21 AM
The essence of the spectrum seems to be focused around one's type and level of social interaction.

There also can be a degree of fixation on discussion of one's own hobbies or interests rather than in typical social dialogues.


Edit: Okay. BTC beat me to that description. I think the 'different way of seeing things' could result from the degree of independence from socialization and, more critically, group-think. That is to say that your ideas aren't so much derived from things you hear while socializing. You aren't just repeating what you absorbed from other people.

Sparko
03-29-2018, 11:36 AM
I don't really know but I always thought it is mostly about how they don't seem to "get" social situations, almost like an outsider looking in. A bit "naive" when it comes to social cues and such. But there is such a wide range that it is hard to pin down. I know it also in some forms seems to be people that are overly sensitive to stimuli like light and sound and touch and will withdraw in order to not have to feel all those sensations.

demi-conservative
03-30-2018, 01:03 AM
Normal folks alert to social cues, body language, tone of voice, emotion, also others. Autists are blind to all this, we can call them stimuli.

For autists, 'balance' is more sensitive to other stimuli.

Zymologist
04-02-2018, 07:42 AM
Thanks, all...interesting responses. There were a couple of facets that I hadn't thought of before, so I'm glad I asked the question.

Goulette
05-01-2018, 11:08 AM
My youngest brother was diagnosed with Asperger's not long ago but that recently switched to DDNOS (almost autistic but not quite). Three of my cousins are autistic on some level. They all display some difficulty socializing normally and can't help it, and have a hard time thinking spontaneously because they are more calculating and logic-oriented, their personality seems more computer-like. External stimuli are difficult to keep track of and process but their inner world is abundant, and abstract thinking comes more easily than it does for non-spetrum people.

MsJack
08-11-2018, 03:27 PM
My son was diagnosed with high-functioning autism almost two years ago, at age 3. 1.75 years of intensive ABA therapy later and he's like a different kid.

My daughter has a technical autism diagnosis, but her main diagnosis is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome / DiGeorge syndrome. She's just now starting ABA therapy at age 12.

I also have a brother with pretty severe autism (think Rain Man / What's Eating Gilbert Grape?). I believe that if he could have had ABA, his condition would be much improved today, but it was still experimental, seldom covered by insurance, and rather abusive back in the '80s and '90s when he was a kid.

The best book I could recommend for understanding autism is NeuroTribes by Steve Silberman.

Zymologist
08-17-2018, 01:54 PM
My son was diagnosed with high-functioning autism almost two years ago, at age 3. 1.75 years of intensive ABA therapy later and he's like a different kid.

My daughter has a technical autism diagnosis, but her main diagnosis is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome / DiGeorge syndrome. She's just now starting ABA therapy at age 12.

I also have a brother with pretty severe autism (think Rain Man / What's Eating Gilbert Grape?). I believe that if he could have had ABA, his condition would be much improved today, but it was still experimental, seldom covered by insurance, and rather abusive back in the '80s and '90s when he was a kid.

The best book I could recommend for understanding autism is NeuroTribes by Steve Silberman.

I'll check out the book; thanks.

Zymologist
09-07-2018, 08:24 AM
I'll check out the book; thanks.

I ordered the book--should get it early next week.