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rwatts
11-11-2014, 05:58 PM
I'm worried that it might hit the comet and bounce off.

And wouldn't it be funny if it succesfully landed and the first organics it found were a bacterium or a virus.

(At the time of writing I think the decision to separate is still some time away)

Jedidiah
11-11-2014, 06:57 PM
I am just waiting.

rwatts
11-11-2014, 08:39 PM
I am just waiting.Yes.

I wish they would release the darn thing, but as you say, one just has to wait.

firstfloor
11-12-2014, 01:01 AM
http://www.theguardian.com/science/across-the-universe/live/2014/nov/12/rosetta-comet-landing-live-blog
and news at many other sites.

firstfloor
11-12-2014, 01:09 AM
The Philae lander is on its way to the surface of comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. About 7 hours until touchdown.

The Pixie
11-12-2014, 01:23 AM
I'm worried that it might hit the comet and bounce off.

And wouldn't it be funny if it succesfully landed and the first organics it found were a bacterium or a virus.

(At the time of writing I think the decision to separate is still some time away)
I was curious what they have to detect such things, and came across this article about the COSEC:

http://www.researchgate.net/publication/225710128_Cosac_The_Cometary_Sampling_and_Composit ion_Experiment_on_Philae/links/09e4150ea9a8d260bf000000

Fairly technical, but as I use GC-MS at work, I found it fascinating. Sounds like it can handle molecular weights up to around 1500. It will be very interesting to see what it finds.

Kelp(p)
11-12-2014, 01:23 AM
:ale:

firstfloor
11-12-2014, 01:28 AM
Perhaps the moderator would like to merge the two threads – see Rosetta comet landing.

rwatts
11-12-2014, 01:41 AM
:ale:I think that will be about 2am my time. A bit to late or a bit too early to crack open a beer to celebrate.

Cow Poke
11-12-2014, 05:09 AM
Touchdown?

http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/12/world/comet-landing-countdown/index.html

firstfloor
11-12-2014, 05:18 AM
"The cold gas thruster on top of the lander does not appear to be working so we will have to rely fully on the harpoons at touchdown,” says Stephan Ulamec, Philae Lander Manager at the DLR German Aerospace Center. “We’ll need some luck not to land on a boulder or a steep slope.”
http://sci.esa.int/rosetta/54930-rosetta-and-philae-go-for-separation/

The Pixie
11-12-2014, 08:06 AM
Just landed.

Sparko
11-12-2014, 08:11 AM
Time to make comet snowcones.

firstfloor
11-12-2014, 08:48 AM
"More analysis of @Philae2014 telemetry indicates harpoons did not fire as 1st thought. Lander in gr8 shape. Team looking at refire options."

rwatts
11-12-2014, 12:11 PM
"More analysis of @Philae2014 telemetry indicates harpoons did not fire as 1st thought. Lander in gr8 shape. Team looking at refire options."Well I staggered out of bed at around 2:30 for the usual nightly trip. Went back to bed and tossed and turned for a bit, but had to get up and see what had happened, if anything. I was just it time to see the final confirmation come through, that it had landed. Sleep came more easily after that.

firstfloor
11-12-2014, 12:45 PM
Well I staggered out of bed at around 2:30 for the usual nightly trip. Went back to bed and tossed and turned for a bit, but had to get up and see what had happened, if anything. I was just it time to see the final confirmation come through, that it had landed. Sleep came more easily after that.It's not over yet: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30026398
"But the news about the harpoons has cast a pall over the celebrations. Scientists will now take a decision on whether to re-fire them.
Scientists believe Philae was in a stable configuration when they last had contact with the probe. But they have now lost radio "visibility" and will only re-establish contact on Thursday."

Cow Poke
11-12-2014, 01:01 PM
Other thread on same topic merged with this one

Kelp(p)
11-12-2014, 05:31 PM
Now apparently the question is whether it bounced once.

rwatts
11-12-2014, 05:41 PM
It's not over yet: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30026398
"But the news about the harpoons has cast a pall over the celebrations. Scientists will now take a decision on whether to re-fire them.
Scientists believe Philae was in a stable configuration when they last had contact with the probe. But they have now lost radio "visibility" and will only re-establish contact on Thursday."I hope, before they decide to fire the harpoons, that they take at least one picture and have a couple of sniffs to find out what kind of chemicals are there. I'm worried that if they fire the harpoons, the might bounce the probe and do something terrible.

firstfloor
11-13-2014, 12:02 AM
I hope, before they decide to fire the harpoons, that they take at least one picture and have a couple of sniffs to find out what kind of chemicals are there. I'm worried that if they fire the harpoons, the might bounce the probe and do something terrible.http://sploid.gizmodo.com/comet-landing-live-coverage-all-systems-go-for-lander-1657715708
“However, we are not sure about its state. It may even be upside down after bouncing not once but twice. Telemetry seems to indicate that it has landed three times.”

“The worse than optimal case scenario is that the ice screws are not secured, so they wouldn't be able to use the drill. They need to be secured to the surface for this, says ESA. The other mission objectives could be accomplished in this situation.”

firstfloor
11-13-2014, 04:20 AM
Big bounce, off target, dark place, lack of solar power, not held down, cannot drill. All in all much less successful than first thought.

Cow Poke
11-13-2014, 04:39 AM
Update on CNN (http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/13/world/comet-landing/index.html?hpt=hp_t2) -- calling it a success.

Link contains video...

CNN) -- This week's historic space probe landing on a comet 310 million miles from Earth wasn't exactly a poetic ballet, but it still worked.

Anchoring harpoons that were supposed to deploy when the Philae probe made impact didn't, lander manager Stephane Ulamec said Thursday.

The lander also came with screws to burrow into the surface. They didn't work either.
It made for a bouncy landing. Ulamec said Philae bounced three times before coming to a stop.

Not pretty, but still the lander came to rest on solid group. A success anyway you look at it.

rogue06
11-13-2014, 06:03 AM
While all the cable news networks interrupted their regular coverage to report on this and a Reuters news report describes concerns that the harpoons designed to keep Philae anchored to the comet failed to deploy meaning that the lander may end up drifting off into space -- leave it to the Twitterverse and Erin Brodwin with Business Insider to hone in on the important things.


All of humanity made history today by landing a spacecraft on a comet.

Unfortunately, many of the women following that development — and a few men, too — were made to feel pretty unwelcome in the space exploration sphere when one of the people leading the mission decided to show up to talk about it wearing a shirt covered in dozens of half-naked women.


Source (http://www.businessinsider.com/rosetta-scientist-matt-taylor-wore-sexist-shirt-for-philae-launch-2014-11#)


Yup. One of the scientists involved in the project Dr. Matt Taylor, who sports "full sleeve" tattoos and has as The Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/11225579/Rosetta-mission-Dr-Matt-Taylor-shows-faith-in-probe-with-giant-leg-tattoo.html) puts it, a "colourful dress sense," wore a Hawaiian shirt which has sparked outrage in some quarters.

The article in Business Insider shows some of the Tweets that includes pictures and quotes one using language unsuitable for Tweb (be forewarned) such as this from Rose Eveleth who writes:


No no women are toooootally welcome in our community, just ask the dude in this shirt. youtube.com/watch?v=NSv6ZBZtzRA&feature=youtu.be... (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSv6ZBZtzRA&feature=youtu.be)

2624

The article then continues with


Contrast the feeling you get seeing this guy in a shirt that objectifies women to this image from the Mars mission control room in India when that country launched its first orbiter to the Red Planet earlier this year.



And shows several Indian women celebrating.

The article finishes with


Interestingly, Taylor recently participated in a live online chat with the Wall Street Journal in which he was asked how he gained acceptance in such a respected field while sporting sleeve-length tattoos.

He responded, "The people I work with don't judge me by my looks but only by the work I have done and can do. Simple."

If only women could hope to someday be judged that way too.

We reached out to the European Space Agency for comment and will update this post if we hear back.



Hopefully the comment they receive from the ESA is to get a life.

seer
11-13-2014, 07:24 AM
Big bounce, off target, dark place, lack of solar power, not held down, cannot drill. All in all much less successful than first thought.

It is still quite a feat...

firstfloor
11-13-2014, 07:27 AM
It is still quite a feat...Quite so. Interesting composite here: https://twitter.com/genetics_blog/status/532528317040443392/photo/1
One leg pointing skyward apparently.

Cow Poke
11-13-2014, 09:05 AM
Quite so. Interesting composite here: https://twitter.com/genetics_blog/status/532528317040443392/photo/1
One leg pointing skyward apparently.

Which direction is skyward?
:outtie:

seer
11-13-2014, 09:12 AM
which direction is skyward?
:outtie:


lol....

Cow Poke
11-13-2014, 09:25 AM
Which direction is skyward?
:outtie:

Reminds me of the courtroom scene where the attorney was demanding to know from Rooster Cogburn.....

Attorney: Mister Cogburn, what direction were you moving when you were backing up.
Cogburn: BACKWARDS! I ALWAYS move backwards when I'm backing up!

HMS_Beagle
11-13-2014, 10:39 AM
First photo from the surface. One leg of the lander is visible

http://media3.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2014_46/765066/141113-esa_philae_civa_20141113_1_6eaca11158d6cd80d535da2 bc7e0ddc3.jpg

firstfloor
11-14-2014, 01:49 AM
The battery has a fairly short life unless the solar cells can recharge it. They are forced to take a risk.

“But the team has decided to operate another moving instrument, named Mupus, on Thursday evening. This could cause Philae to shift, but calculations show that it would be in a direction that could improve the amount of sunlight falling on the probe. A change in angle of only a few degrees could help. A new panoramic image will be taken after the Mupus deployment to see if there has been any movement.”

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/nov/13/philae-lander-tight-spot-comet-tough-decisions-esa-rosetta

firstfloor
11-14-2014, 05:30 AM
Which direction is skyward?
:outtie:Hi CP. Hope all well with you. All three legs on ground. Three sides in shadow. Battery not expected to last past next contact.

firstfloor
11-14-2014, 06:40 AM
In hang-out today, Dr Matt Taylor makes emotional apology for wearing colourful 'babes' shirt.
http://freethoughtblogs.com/pharyngula/files/2014/11/matttaylor.png
http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/nov/13/why-women-in-science-are-annoyed-at-rosetta-mission-scientists-clothing

Sparko
11-14-2014, 08:12 AM
In hang-out today, Dr Matt Taylor makes emotional apology for wearing colourful 'babes' shirt.
http://freethoughtblogs.com/pharyngula/files/2014/11/matttaylor.png
http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/nov/13/why-women-in-science-are-annoyed-at-rosetta-mission-scientists-clothing

Just shows how out of touch the liberal news agencies are. We just landed a probe on a comet and all they can do is whine about how sexist someone's shirt is. :ahem:

Paprika
11-14-2014, 08:20 AM
Unfortunately, many of the women following that development ó and a few men, too ó were made to feel pretty unwelcome in the space exploration sphere when one of the people leading the mission decided to show up to talk about it wearing a shirt covered in dozens of half-naked women.


No no women are toooootally welcome in our community, just ask the dude in this shirt.
They don't feel welcome, therefore they aren't. :duh:

Cow Poke
11-14-2014, 05:15 PM
Not looking so good (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/11232439/Rosetta-probe-may-hold-clues-to-life-on-Earth...but-scientists-cannot-get-to-them.html)?

The Rosetta probe could be holding proof that life on Earth began when comets bombarded our planet, but we may never see the evidence, after scientists lost contact with the lander on Friday.

It was feared that some of the most important scientific data could be forfeited if the signal could not be re-established at midnight.

Astrophysicists have been working around the clock to find a way to move the Philae probe out from under a cliff and back into sunlight where it could absorb the Sunís rays and carry on its mission before its battery goes flat.

On Friday afternoon, in a final effort to collect samples from the surface of the comet, they ditched attempts to relocate the probe, and instead, began drilling. However contact was lost before the data could be sent back to Earth.

rwatts
11-14-2014, 06:07 PM
Not looking so good (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/11232439/Rosetta-probe-may-hold-clues-to-life-on-Earth...but-scientists-cannot-get-to-them.html)?

The Rosetta probe could be holding proof that life on Earth began when comets bombarded our planet, but we may never see the evidence, after scientists lost contact with the lander on Friday.

It was feared that some of the most important scientific data could be forfeited if the signal could not be re-established at midnight.

Astrophysicists have been working around the clock to find a way to move the Philae probe out from under a cliff and back into sunlight where it could absorb the Sun’s rays and carry on its mission before its battery goes flat.

On Friday afternoon, in a final effort to collect samples from the surface of the comet, they ditched attempts to relocate the probe, and instead, began drilling. However contact was lost before the data could be sent back to Earth. From what I gather, they have a lot of data, including some drill samples. They were able to move the probe to a better position BUT, by the time they got the data, the probe decided to go to sleep. It looks as if it's batteries finally ran out sending that last lot of data or making that final attempt to move.

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/nov/14/rosetta-philae-lander-hop-comet

firstfloor
11-15-2014, 01:31 AM
I cannot find any discussion about this but I wonder of it is possible that the comet’s rotation may later illuminate the shadow where Philae currently sits and allow the battery to recharge. I think they have rotated the body 35 degrees to try and get more light on one of the panels but the lander is still mainly in shadow. The lander was working hard at the time of shutdown which means that it was consuming energy faster than it could generate it. It might just reactivate later on but part of the problem is catching it awake at the same time that Rosetta is able to receive data. Overall, the team seems to be not very optimistic about re-establishing contact.

Oh! In other news, a witch is burned in Paraguay??&!?*!!!
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/05/paraguay-witch-burned-alive_n_6108646.html

rogue06
11-16-2014, 05:43 AM
Not looking so good (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/11232439/Rosetta-probe-may-hold-clues-to-life-on-Earth...but-scientists-cannot-get-to-them.html)?

The Rosetta probe could be holding proof that life on Earth began when comets bombarded our planet, but we may never see the evidence, after scientists lost contact with the lander on Friday.

It was feared that some of the most important scientific data could be forfeited if the signal could not be re-established at midnight.

Astrophysicists have been working around the clock to find a way to move the Philae probe out from under a cliff and back into sunlight where it could absorb the Sunís rays and carry on its mission before its battery goes flat.

On Friday afternoon, in a final effort to collect samples from the surface of the comet, they ditched attempts to relocate the probe, and instead, began drilling. However contact was lost before the data could be sent back to Earth.
Yet according to this source (http://phys.org/news/2014-11-comet-probe-science-treasure-hours.html):


Europe's science probe Philae sent home a treasure trove of data from a comet heading towards the Sun before falling silent as its power ran out, mission control said Saturday.

Crowning a historic feat, the robot lab streamed data from its experiments back to its mother ship Rosetta in the final hours before its battery ran down.

This included the outcome of an eagerly-waited chemistry test of a sample drilled from the comet's icy and dusty surface, scientists said.

"Rosetta's lander has completed its primary science mission," the European Space Agency (ESA) said.
Lacking power, its instruments and most systems went into standby mode after three days of non-stop work, sending back data that will keep scientists busy for years.

"The data collected by Philae and Rosetta is set to make this mission a game-changer in cometary science," said Matt Taylor, Rosetta project scientist.

Philae had landed in a dark shadow after a bouncy triple touchdown Wednesday.

It did not get enough sunlight to recharge its batteries sufficiently to extend its mission beyond its initial 60-hour work programme.

Mission engineers do not rule out making contact with the lander in the coming months as Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko moves closer to the Sun.

Conceived more than 20 years ago, the Rosetta mission aims at shedding light on the origins of the Solar System 4.6 billion years ago, and maybe even life on Earth.

...

Finally, in the most important but riskiest experiment of all, they drilled a core of material out of the comet surface to analyse its chemical signature.

All the data had to be stored and dispatched back to Rosetta as the power indicators shrank towards the red zone.

"We received everything," mission scientist Jean-Pierre Bibring told AFP. "The word is 'fabulous,' just 'fabulous.'

The team's eagerly-awaited first report will be made at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco next month.

The "67P" comet is due to loop around the Sun next year, flaring gas from its head and leaving a spectacular icy trail of ice from water stripped from its surface.

Rosetta will escort it until the comet heads back out towards the depths of the Solar System in December 2015.




The article was accompanied by the following graphic (from a different source for its larger size):

http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/straitstimes.com/files/20141114/sjcometgraphic1411.jpg

rwatts
11-16-2014, 11:40 AM
I'm worried that it might hit the comet and bounce off.

And wouldn't it be funny if it succesfully landed and the first organics it found were a bacterium or a virus.

(At the time of writing I think the decision to separate is still some time away)


Philae, it's shadow, and where it first hit before the big bounce:-

http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/11/16/philae_spotted_after_first_landing/

Cow Poke
11-16-2014, 01:06 PM
It's still pretty amazing, regardless.

rwatts
11-17-2014, 11:06 AM
I'm worried that it might hit the comet and bounce off.

And wouldn't it be funny if it succesfully landed and the first organics it found were a bacterium or a virus.

(At the time of writing I think the decision to separate is still some time away)The bounce:-

http://arstechnica.com/science/2014/11/high-res-rosetta-pix-catch-little-philae-lander-bouncing-across-comet/

firstfloor
11-18-2014, 03:54 AM
The bounce:-
http://arstechnica.com/science/2014/11/high-res-rosetta-pix-catch-little-philae-lander-bouncing-across-comet/First bounce. “From left to right, the images show Philae descending towards and across the comet before touchdown. The image taken after touchdown, at 15:43 GMT, confirms that the lander was moving east, as first suggested by the data returned by the CONSERT experiment, and at a speed of about 0.5 m/s.
The final location of Philae is still not known, but after touching down and bouncing again at 17:25 GMT, it reached there at 17:32 GMT.”

Sparko
11-18-2014, 05:55 AM
Everyone knows that the whole mission is a coverup to hide the fact that the comet is an alien spaceship!

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/technology-science/ufos-rosetta-mission-comet-is-4628568


Reuters
Comet or UFO? Philae has landed...but on what?

Space probe Philae is actually a UFO attempting to make contact with humans, conspiracy theorists are claiming.

Ufologists claim the European Space Agency's (ESA) craft, which on Wednesday completed the extraordinary feat of landing on a speeding comet, is of alien origin.

An email published on the website UFOSightingsDaily.com claimed the agency had joined forces with NASA to "cover-up" the celestial body's true extra-terrestrial nature.

The email, purportedly written by a secret whistle-blowing ESA employee of the ESA, reads: “Do not think for ONE MOMENT that a space agency would suddenly decide to spend billions of dollars to build and send a spacecraft on a 12-year journey to simply take some close-up images of a randomly picked out comet floating in space.”

“Comet 67P is NOT a comet.

“Some 20 years ago Nasa began detecting radio bursts from an unknown origin out in space.

"It would later be known that these had likely come from the direction of the now named comet 67P.

"It does show signs on its outside of machine like parts and unnatural terrain.”

Ending on an ominous note, it adds: “Whatever this object is, it did not ask to be found or scrutinised.”

Ufologist Scott Waring said he believed the signals being emitted from the comet were a “greeting” to humans.

He added: “If it was a warning, they would not allow the ESA craft to have landed.

“I believe the landing of the ESA craft was the equivalent of a first handshake.

"They will make another move soon probably.

"Alien structures are on the comet.

"I don’t believe it’s natural.”

ESA has confirmed that the comet is emitting a "mystery song" - however, this has only fuelled theories that it is a UFO attempting to make contact with Earth.

Mr Waring added: “In my opinion this is not a code.

"It is how a species of aliens communicate to one another without speaking.

"A form of telepathy put into primitive radio signals.

"It's the only way this species can communicate to us.

"This is their thoughts.
---
http://www.ufosightingsdaily.com/2014/11/esa-confirms-that-comet-67p-does.html




DUN DUN DUNNNNNNNN!

rogue06
11-18-2014, 06:44 AM
Obvious not a UFO but a living organism. A spawn of Mogo the Living Planet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mogo)[1]. The probe's drill wasn't collecting samples but was in reality a hypodermic needle administering a sedative.









1. Or Oa the Living Planet (http://www.comicvine.com/oa-the-living-planet/4005-60233/). Or Ego the Living Planet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ego_the_Living_Planet). The Living Planet family has grown over the years.

firstfloor
11-24-2014, 02:53 AM
God’s eye view.
http://sci.esa.int/where_is_rosetta/