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DesertBerean
01-28-2014, 05:01 PM
It's the anniversary of the Challenger explosion so this article was published about memories of that and other terrible moments. I dunno...i don't think my recollection of 9/11 have varied. Unfortunately, a lot of the sites that I posted my recollections on are gone unless I can locate em on the WB machine.

http://m.csmonitor.com/Science/2014/0128/Where-were-you-when-the-Challenger-exploded-Why-your-memory-might-be-wrong

Jedidiah
01-28-2014, 06:30 PM
I do not really have any memories of the Challenger explosion. To me it was just another terrible event. Memories of 9/11 are more real, and memories of the JFK assassination also. I have never written them down and do not expect to - discussions such as this aside.

shunyadragon
01-28-2014, 07:18 PM
I do not consider the explosion of the Challenger as that significant, though tragic. The events and history surrounding in 9/11 is far more significant. I was in China seated in a large bar/restaurant in the morning when the images came over the TV, and I followed the story in detail over the internet.

DesertBerean
01-28-2014, 09:15 PM
Hm. Comments on the article?

shunyadragon
01-29-2014, 04:32 PM
Hm. Comments on the article?

The article is interesting. From what I have read of memory of significant events such as this is that the memory may be sharp as to the event, but our interpretation of events some times is lacking. When testifying witnesses of crime, they remember the event, but often they get things mixed up. Most of this deals not with first hand witnesses, but where we were and what we remember about the event.

Roy
01-31-2014, 11:12 AM
It's the anniversary of the Challenger explosion so this article was published about memories of that and other terrible moments. I dunno...i don't think my recollection of 9/11 have varied.I don't think mine have either - I have vivid memories of exactly where I was and what I was doing during both the Challenger incident (watching the launch live in a student lounge) and 9-11 (when a colleague working from home phoned into the office and since there was no TV there we went to the chalet I was staying in and saw the tower falls from there). 9-11 is particularly vivid since at the time I was working for a company headquartered 2 blocks from world trade plaza.

Roy

P.S. I also know where I was during JFK's assassination (a UK military base), but didn't see it for obvious reasons.

seer
01-31-2014, 12:16 PM
It's the anniversary of the Challenger explosion so this article was published about memories of that and other terrible moments. I dunno...i don't think my recollection of 9/11 have varied. Unfortunately, a lot of the sites that I posted my recollections on are gone unless I can locate em on the WB machine.

http://m.csmonitor.com/Science/2014/0128/Where-were-you-when-the-Challenger-exploded-Why-your-memory-might-be-wrong

This is my theory. I'm 60 years old and in the electronic field - I think there is only so much room in the human brain. It's like every time I learn something new, I lose a childhood memory.

Wally
01-31-2014, 01:18 PM
This is my theory. I'm 60 years old and in the electronic field - I think there is only so much room in the human brain. It's like every time I learn something new, I lose a childhood memory.

That was an episode of "Married With Children". One of my favorites. :)

rwatts
02-02-2014, 12:00 PM
This is my theory. I'm 60 years old and in the electronic field - I think there is only so much room in the human brain. It's like every time I learn something new, I lose a childhood memory.I did like an old Calvin and Hobbs cartoon where Calvin sneezed, then went running to his mom while looking into his handkerchief, crying something akin to "Mommy, mommy. I think I just blew my brains out".

Jedidiah
02-02-2014, 02:38 PM
This is my theory. I'm 60 years old and in the electronic field - I think there is only so much room in the human brain. It's like every time I learn something new, I lose a childhood memory.

Trouble with that theory is that at 72, I can remember a lot of things from long ago more easily than newly learned stuff.