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KingsGambit
01-01-2015, 02:23 PM
I work retail in a mostly Mexican neighborhood. We sell a ton of candles with pictures of saints on them; they're officially labeled as "religious candles". I assume these are Catholics buying them; what exactly is their purpose?

Andius
01-01-2015, 02:41 PM
Assuming they are of the types that also exhibit a diverse choice of colors (The picture indicating the corresponding saint for the color and petition).

http://cdn2.bigcommerce.com/server1400/23ae9/product_images/uploaded_images/vela-santo-border.jpg

Their purpose is to petition a saint or angel with something. For example, to St. Anthony of Padua, a maroon candle for special petitions, green for financial aid, orange to find love. To St. Michael (the angel) , violet-fuchsia for spiritual protection against pride, envy, and selfishness. The candles are maintained lit to aid in the recalling of the petition, to dedicate the candle to the selected saint during the prayer, and to stay mindful about the prayer. They are quite handy when one is unable to reach a monastery or cathedral, where they may house a statue of a saint or Jesus himself, and light a candle there.

Bill the Cat
01-01-2015, 05:52 PM
They smell nice too

One Bad Pig
01-01-2015, 06:12 PM
Assuming they are of the types that also exhibit a diverse choice of colors (The picture indicating the corresponding saint for the color and petition).

http://cdn2.bigcommerce.com/server1400/23ae9/product_images/uploaded_images/vela-santo-border.jpg

Their purpose is to petition a saint or angel with something. For example, to St. Anthony of Padua, a maroon candle for special petitions, green for financial aid, orange to find love. To St. Michael (the angel) , violet-fuchsia for spiritual protection against pride, envy, and selfishness. The candles are maintained lit to aid in the recalling of the petition, to dedicate the candle to the selected saint during the prayer, and to stay mindful about the prayer. They are quite handy when one is unable to reach a monastery or cathedral, where they may house a statue of a saint or Jesus himself, and light a candle there.
Interesting. In Orthodoxy, we light candles in remembrance of the departed, but that's about it. They're usually plain beeswax, though I've seen them in jars like that (without saints pictured on them).

mossrose
01-01-2015, 06:18 PM
So, do they have to be special candles you buy, or can I take an old one I have around here and glue a picture of somebody on it and then pray to that person?

One Bad Pig
01-01-2015, 06:29 PM
So, do they have to be special candles you buy, or can I take an old one I have around here and glue a picture of somebody on it and then pray to that person?
I'm fairly certain you could make one yourself, if that was your inclination. I've seen them at secular grocery stores, mostly with Goya products. :shrug: I think I even have a couple upstairs, though I had no idea what they were for when I bought them.

mossrose
01-01-2015, 06:36 PM
I'm fairly certain you could make one yourself, if that was your inclination. I've seen them at secular grocery stores, mostly with Goya products. :shrug: I think I even have a couple upstairs, though I had no idea what they were for when I bought them.

I don't want to make one, just wondered if they were specially blessed by a priest or something.

Personally, I pray directly to God or Jesus or the Holy Spirit, without a candle.

One Bad Pig
01-01-2015, 06:59 PM
I don't want to make one,
I would be :shocked: if you did! :tongue:

just wondered if they were specially blessed by a priest or something.
:hrm: I don't think so - though if they were, there would be no difference as far as I can see between a commercially made product and something homemade. :shrug:


Personally, I pray directly to God or Jesus or the Holy Spirit, without a candle.
I'm certain that you misspoke here, and intended to say "the Father" rather than "God" :poke:.

I pray directly to God, and I pray to the saints, and I ask others still living to pray for me. I sometimes light a candle before praying; it seems to help get me in the right frame of mind.

robrecht
01-01-2015, 07:12 PM
I wonder how widespread these kinds of candles are (with pictures of saints and symbolic colors)? Maybe they are more prevalent among Hispanic Catholics? I've never seen them in the parts of the US, Europe and Canada where I've lived.

mossrose
01-01-2015, 07:20 PM
I would be :shocked: if you did! :tongue:

Thought you might!


:hrm: I don't think so - though if they were, there would be no difference as far as I can see between a commercially made product and something homemade. :shrug:

It's interesting.


I'm certain that you misspoke here, and intended to say "the Father" rather than "God" :poke:.

You are correct. I should have said, "God the Father".


I pray directly to God, and I pray to the saints, and I ask others still living to pray for me. I sometimes light a candle before praying; it seems to help get me in the right frame of mind.

And I pray to God and ask others still living to pray for me. Never prayed to any saints, living or dead, and have never lit a candle before I pray.

And quit pokin' me in the eye!

Catholicity
01-01-2015, 09:26 PM
Its common to purchase a candle and have it blessed by a nearby priest. In the Catholic Calender there are multiple major feast days during advent Christmas and the New Year. I imagine that especially in the Hispanic population the sell of a St. candle would be high. Happy New Year. Today is the day of the Theotokos.....

robrecht
01-05-2015, 05:10 AM
And I pray to God and ask others still living to pray for me. Never prayed to any saints, living or dead, and have never lit a candle before I pray.Just curious, what is your understanding of 'the communion of the saints' in the Apostles creed? I presume it is not only the living saints in the one, holy, catholic and apostolic church, just mentioned previously in the creed, but it could be read as a further specification of the sharing of all things in common among the living faithful. Do you think it applies to the saints who are no longer living? Personally, I also do not typically use the language of praying to the the saints, but I do think of myself as praying in communion with all the angels and saints.

mossrose
01-05-2015, 10:34 AM
Just curious, what is your understanding of 'the communion of the saints' in the Apostles creed? I presume it is not only the living saints in the one, holy, catholic and apostolic church, just mentioned previously in the creed, but it could be read as a further specification of the sharing of all things in common among the living faithful. Do you think it applies to the saints who are no longer living? Personally, I also do not typically use the language of praying to the the saints, but I do think of myself as praying in communion with all the angels and saints.

One of my favourite hymns is The Church's One Foundation.


The church's one foundation
is Jesus Christ her Lord.
She is his new creation
by water and the word.
From heaven he came and sought her
to be his holy bride.
With his own blood he bought her,
and for her life he died.

Elect from every nation,
yet one o'er all the earth,
her charter of salvation:
one Lord, one faith, one birth.
One holy name she blesses,
partakes one holy food,
and to one hope she presses,
with every grace endued.

Mid toil and tribulation,
and tumult of her war,
she waits the consummation
of peace forevermore:
till with the vision glorious
her longing eyes are blest,
and the great church victorious
shall be the church at rest.

Yet she on earth has union
with God, the Three in One,
and mystic sweet communion
with those whose rest is won:
O happy ones and holy!
Lord, give us grace that we,
like them, the meek and lowly,
on high may dwell with Thee.

The last verse is pertinent to what you are asking me. I believe that all believers are saints, living or dead, not just those whom the Catholic Church canonizes. Those already in the presence of the Lord are at rest, while we who are alive are still struggling with the presence of sin in our lives. They have achieved perfect holiness while we still struggle with our sin nature. One day we will be like them.

We have union with God, as do they. We have sweet communion with them because we are all part of that body of Christ, the Church, whether we are still in this life or have passed into glory. I do not believe that any of those members of the body of Christ who are in His presence even care about what we are doing or thinking or that they hear us praying to them. They are focused on the worship of God.

The communion of the saints in the Apostle's Creed is, then, imo, referring to not only the fellowship of the body of Christ still living, but that union in Christ with those who have died as part of the same body.

robrecht
01-05-2015, 11:00 AM
I do not believe that any of those members of the body of Christ who are in His presence even care about what we are doing or thinking or that they hear us praying to them. They are focused on the worship of God.
Thanks!

I like to think that they still care about us, which would include what we are thinking and doing.

Just to clarify one point just in case you or others may not be aware. The Catholic church does not only consider those who have been canonized to be saints. The canonization process arose in order to prevent abusive practices.

mossrose
01-05-2015, 11:58 AM
Thanks!

I like to think that they still care about us, which would include what we are thinking and doing.

Just to clarify one point just in case you or others may not be aware. The Catholic church does not only consider those who have been canonized to be saints. The canonization process arose in order to prevent abusive practices.

I wasn't aware of that, thank you!

Adrift
01-05-2015, 12:34 PM
So, do they have to be special candles you buy, or can I take an old one I have around here and glue a picture of somebody on it and then pray to that person?

I wonder if the less educated Catholics who buy these believe they have some special, blessed properties to them. It seems like it'd be easy to become superstitious with these things.

One Bad Pig
01-05-2015, 01:43 PM
One of my favourite hymns is The Church's One Foundation.

The last verse is pertinent to what you are asking me. I believe that all believers are saints, living or dead, not just those whom the Catholic Church canonizes.
:yes:

Those already in the presence of the Lord are at rest, while we who are alive are still struggling with the presence of sin in our lives. They have achieved perfect holiness while we still struggle with our sin nature. One day we will be like them.
Not entirely sure about this, as we are all on this side of the final Judgment.


We have union with God, as do they. We have sweet communion with them because we are all part of that body of Christ, the Church, whether we are still in this life or have passed into glory.
Agreed.

I do not believe that any of those members of the body of Christ who are in His presence even care about what we are doing or thinking or that they hear us praying to them. They are focused on the worship of God.
:hrm: We are all in the presence of Christ. And I do not think that, even in eternity, we will be so focused on the worship of God that we ignore everybody else completely.


The communion of the saints in the Apostle's Creed is, then, imo, referring to not only the fellowship of the body of Christ still living, but that union in Christ with those who have died as part of the same body.

:thumb:

One Bad Pig
01-05-2015, 01:47 PM
I wonder if the less educated Catholics who buy these believe they have some special, blessed properties to them. It seems like it'd be easy to become superstitious with these things.
If they've been blessed by a priest, and that blessing does anything, then to that extent they have blessed properties to them. I agree that superstition is possible with those less educated, but IMO that's a problem in any religious group's less educated members.

Adrift
01-05-2015, 02:13 PM
If they've been blessed by a priest, and that blessing does anything, then to that extent they have blessed properties to them. I agree that superstition is possible with those less educated, but IMO that's a problem in any religious group's less educated members.

I'm thinking those who just buy them off the grocery store shelf and take them home and believe they have some sort of magical properties that will increase the likelihood that their prayers will be received. In the Protestant tradition this might be equivalent to prayer mats and anointing oil (I don't usually find those in stores though). Everytime I pass these types of candles in the store it makes me feel a bit, I don't know, uneasy, or sad or something.

mossrose
01-05-2015, 04:27 PM
:yes:

:highfive:


Not entirely sure about this, as we are all on this side of the final Judgment.

The redeemed have already been judged for their sin, the only judgment left for us is for our works, as per 1 Cor. 3.


10 According to the grace of God which was given to me, like a wise master builder I laid a foundation, and another is building on it. But each man must be careful how he builds on it.

11 For no man can lay a foundation other than the one which is laid, which is Jesus Christ.

12 Now if any man builds on the foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, straw,

13 each man’s work will become evident; for the day will show it because it is to be revealed with fire, and the fire itself will test the quality of each man’s work.

14 If any man’s work which he has built on it remains, he will receive a reward.

15 If any man’s work is burned up, he will suffer loss; but he himself will be saved, yet so as through fire.

Those who have died are already in glory and yes, they will face that "works judgment" with the rest of us. But judgement for sin occurred when we repented and accepted the gift of salvation through faith in Christ.


Agreed.

:highfive:


:hrm: We are all in the presence of Christ.

Yes, but not physically.


And I do not think that, even in eternity, we will be so focused on the worship of God that we ignore everybody else completely.


We shall have to agree to disagree on this one, then.

:razz:


:thumb:

:highfive:

One Bad Pig
01-06-2015, 08:07 AM
The redeemed have already been judged for their sin, the only judgment left for us is for our works, as per 1 Cor. 3.

Those who have died are already in glory and yes, they will face that "works judgment" with the rest of us. But judgement for sin occurred when we repented and accepted the gift of salvation through faith in Christ.
I think you're reading a fair amount into that passage. We're getting rather far afield, however.

We are all in the presence of Christ.
Yes, but not physically. [/quote]
:hrm: Sort of. Not sure how a disembodied soul can be said to be "physically" present.


And I do not think that, even in eternity, we will be so focused on the worship of God that we ignore everybody else completely.
We shall have to agree to disagree on this one, then.
I urge you to consider re-thinking that. Interpersonal relationships in scripture are second only to our relationship with God.

For if we have been united together in the likeness of His death, certainly we also shall be in the likeness of His resurrection
In the resurrection, we will be united together. If we are so focused on the worship of God that we ignore everything and everyone else completely, then that has little meaning. Why have a new heavens and new earth if no one's going to notice it?

Rushing Jaws
02-11-2015, 04:42 AM
I wonder how widespread these kinds of candles are (with pictures of saints and symbolic colors)? Maybe they are more prevalent among Hispanic Catholics? I've never seen them in the parts of the US, Europe and Canada where I've lived.


## I've seen them in Catholic bookshops in the UK, in both Scotland & England - so the decoration is not a purely Hispanic thing.