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shunyadragon
09-11-2015, 07:01 AM
In my readings, and experiences with interaction with Jews I find an indifference to other religions and their believers. My interaction with Jews reflects a polite indifferent tolerance and distance to other beliefs including the Baha'i Faith. Where other religions like Christianity there is more and active involvement and interest good and bad relationships concerning other religions.

For example: Jews generally consider Jesus, and Christian Jews to be heretics, where non-Jewish Christian believers are not considered heretics, but simply other non-Jews who believe differently.

Cow Poke
09-11-2015, 08:49 AM
:popcorn:

Scorching Wizard
09-11-2015, 01:57 PM
In my readings, and experiences with interaction with Jews I find an indifference to other religions and their believers. My interaction with Jews reflects a polite indifferent tolerance and distance to other beliefs including the Baha'i Faith.

I view that "indifference" as a positive thing. We don't force our beliefs down anyone's throat. Nor do we say that only Jews will get to Heaven. Non-Jews can believe whatever they want to believe, it has no effect on us. I wish that other religions could find the same peace that we enjoy.


Jews generally consider Jesus, and Christian Jews to be heretics, where non-Jewish Christian believers are not considered heretics, but simply other non-Jews who believe differently.

Yes, those are different. According to Mirriam-Webster Dictionary, heretics are 1) dissenter from established religious dogma or 2) one who dissents from an accepted belief or doctrine. We define people that that were formerly Jews, but are now idol-worshippers, as heretics. We try to get them to see reason and return to Judaism. People that were never Jews are in the class of people that can have their own beliefs (see above).

shunyadragon
09-20-2015, 06:57 PM
I view that "indifference" as a positive thing. We don't force our beliefs down anyone's throat. Nor do we say that only Jews will get to Heaven. Non-Jews can believe whatever they want to believe, it has no effect on us. I wish that other religions could find the same peace that we enjoy.

I do not believe that it is a matter of who 'forces their beliefs down anyone throat,' because the indifference is for all who are non-jews regardless. The highlighted above is very revealing.


Yes, those are different. According to Mirriam-Webster Dictionary, heretics are 1) dissenter from established religious dogma or 2) one who dissents from an accepted belief or doctrine. We define people that that were formerly Jews, but are now idol-worshippers, as heretics. We try to get them to see reason and return to Judaism. People that were never Jews are in the class of people that can have their own beliefs (see above).

By the definitions all those who consider the Torah a Holy Book would be dissenter of accepted belief and doctrine and a heretic including Christians who believe Jesus Christ is God. Yes, Jews do consider non-Jews with indifference regardless. This the interesting issue of the nature of the culture of being Jewish particularly those blood related.

Scorching Wizard
09-21-2015, 08:25 AM
So what do you consider "revealing"?

We don't apply the heretic label to everybody. We only apply it to people that were formerly adherents of Judaism that are now adherents of a different religion. What's your issue? What do you think is so interesting?

shunyadragon
09-21-2015, 08:38 AM
So what do you consider "revealing"?

We don't apply the heretic label to everybody. We only apply it to people that were formerly adherents of Judaism that are now adherents of a different religion. What's your issue? What do you think is so interesting?

The isolationist nature of Judaism.

Scorching Wizard
09-21-2015, 09:23 AM
OK, so you're back to your first post.

Post#1 meet my post#3.

shunyadragon
09-21-2015, 08:20 PM
OK, so you're back to your first post.

Post#1 meet my post#3.

I do not consider 'indifference' a good thing. It is an isolationist view both spiritually and physically, which creates a stage of violence between religions.

robrecht
09-21-2015, 08:43 PM
I do not consider 'indifference' a good thing. It is an isolationist view both spiritually and physically, which creates a stage of violence between religions.
Indifference is much better than misrepresentation.

apostoli
09-22-2015, 02:52 AM
I do not consider 'indifference' a good thing. It is an isolationist view both spiritually and physically, which creates a stage of violence between religions.in my experience the "Jews" are not indifferent when it comes to other "Jews" or for that matter Christians. There is huge intolerance (in declining order) between the ultra-orthodox, the orthodox, another division whose label I forget, and the liberals. Then there are the prejudices like it is OK for a Jewish male to marry a Christian but total anathema for a Jewish girl to marry a Christian (I presume the rule applies to any inter-marriage).

I had/have a very close Jewish friend who was engaged to a Jewish guy. Though she was a practicing Jew, his family did everything to break the engagement, because she was not Jewish enough (???) They were successful.

Scorching Wizard
09-22-2015, 07:05 AM
I do not consider 'indifference' a good thing. It is an isolationist view both spiritually and physically, which creates a stage of violence between religions.

I don't see how indifference leads to violence. Throughout history, it was other religions' zeal for conversion that led to violence against us.

Scorching Wizard
09-22-2015, 07:15 AM
in my experience the "Jews" are not indifferent when it comes to other "Jews" or for that matter Christians. There is huge intolerance (in declining order) between the ultra-orthodox, the orthodox, another division whose label I forget (sic: Conservative), and the liberals (sic: Reform).

When it comes to inter-religious relationships, it really depends on what the topic is. On the whole, we are quite touchy about conversion attempts by Christians. We've had a long history of blood, persecution, and intolerance lodged against us from Christianity.


Then there are the prejudices like it is OK for a Jewish male to marry a Christian but total anathema for a Jewish girl to marry a Christian (I presume the rule applies to any inter-marriage).

Actually, we are mostly against any Jew marrying someone of a different religion. And that anti inter-marriage concept applies among Christians as well. I personally know someone whose parents squashed a wedding between a Protestant and a Catholic.

Adrift
09-22-2015, 07:29 AM
When it comes to inter-religious relationships, it really depends on what the topic is. On the whole, we are quite touchy about conversion attempts by Christians. We've had a long history of blood, persecution, and intolerance lodged against us from Christianity.

Well there was that period in Yemen in the 5th-6th century where it went the other way around.

One Bad Pig
09-22-2015, 09:19 AM
Well there was that period in Yemen in the 5th-6th century where it went the other way around.
...not to mention the first couple centuries CE (not that this excuses subsequent persecution the other way 'round).

shunyadragon
09-23-2015, 06:02 AM
I don't see how indifference leads to violence. Throughout history, it was other religions' zeal for conversion that led to violence against us.

True and false. Throughout history it was religious zeal, not necessarily for conversion, that religions including Judaism committed violence against non-believers. The over all problem is that the isolationist paradigm breeds separation, indifference and lack of concern for the universal condition of humanity beyond ones own beliefs, which by the evidence in history breeds violence and worse.

shunyadragon
09-23-2015, 06:06 AM
Actually, we are mostly against any Jew marrying someone of a different religion. And that anti inter-marriage concept applies among Christians as well. I personally know someone whose parents squashed a wedding between a Protestant and a Catholic.

True, this demonstrates isolationism not only in Judaism, but other religion as well. In other religions it is a more aggressive isolationist view including a history aggressive efforts to convert others who believe differently.

Scorching Wizard
09-25-2015, 12:07 PM
In other religions it is a more aggressive isolationist view including a history aggressive efforts to convert others who believe differently.

As One bad pig and Adrift point out, it has been over 1000 years since Judaism has done that. Hopefully other religions like Christianity and Islam can catch up to us and be indifferent to those that don't share their beliefs. The world will be much more peaceful then.