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Thread: JPHolding considers me a nut - that is why I am here

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    BBL tomorrow!

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    Dept. of Redundancy Dept. Cow Poke's Avatar
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    1 Tim 2:5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.

  3. Amen thewriteranon, Christianbookworm amen'd this post.
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    Must...have...caffeine One Bad Pig's Avatar
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    Upon reflection, JPH is correct.
    Enter the Church and wash away your sins. For here there is a hospital and not a court of law. Do not be ashamed to enter the Church; be ashamed when you sin, but not when you repent. – St. John Chrysostom

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    I have drawn lines between the examples to not jumble it all together, starting each with your quote of me, then your comment, then my clarification.

    __________________________________________________ _

    I "Note, on youtube comboxes I get into comment duels very much more often, and therefore know that people agreeing with JPHolding, more Atheists than Prots, but some of those too, agree wholeheartedly or beyond with JPH's nice choice of epithete."

    Quote Originally Posted by thewriteranon View Post
    The word "comboxes" is not a word. I guess you meant comments? "Duels" is not the word we use in English for debate. I read that and immediately thought of Harry Potter. The last half of the sentence I'm having trouble putting together into something that has meaning. I think you used the wrong present tense here and I don't know where you're talking about atheists agreeing with JP. In calling you a nut I suppose? I've only just figured out what you maybe meant here by trying to dissect it. Also epithet is spelled without an E at the end.
    1) By comboxes, I mean "comment boxes" under either a youtube video or a blog post.

    2) Duels by itself is not a word for debate, but as your reference to magic duels in HP (which I haven't read), adding a noun to make it a composite word may slightly change the meaning.

    A "combox duel" is obviously a duel conducted in comboxes (as defined above, the abbreviation does exist, I did not make it up). A duel in comboxes is most often either a debate or a duel of bad language. A duel in comboxes that is a debate is somewhat different from a debate which is moderated, oral and counts in minutes. For instance, a combox duel can be rude and can be one comment or two per day and go on for a month and be resumed after a year. So "combox duel" is definitely a better chosen phrase than just "debate".

    Actually, I wrote "on youtube comboxes", namely as opposed to the ones under my own blogs, I get into "comment duels". But if I hadn't already used combox, the field in which comments are submitted under a post of video, I

    3) The last half, less elliptically:

    Note, on youtube comboxes I get in to comment duels very much more often [than under own blog's posts], and therefore know that people agreeing with JPHolding [in general], [these people being] more Atheists than Prots, but some of those [namely Prots] too, agree wholeheartedly or beyond [what is wholehearted in JPH's case] with [said] JPH's nice choice of epithete [of calling me a nut / nutso].

    4) In a side margin to "Faultful Ćgistes", the commenter of Chapman's Odyssey* remarks that this is a mistranslation, and since faultless is an "epithet" the word occurs - twice spelled "the epithete".

    In a work of my own, I used the spelling "feasant". It is the pure English one. Like "phaisant" is the pure French-foreign-word one. BOTH inbetweens exist as well as these extremes in Oxford English Dictionary (or whatever the larger one is called), both the common "pheasant" and the uncommon "faisant".

    Since you understood the word, I had clearly not garbled the sentence.

    __________________________________________________ ___

    * [Note to I]Found after googling "the epithete" on google books:

    https://books.google.fr/books?id=Lck...ete%22&f=false

    If you think a spelling is faulty, google it. It's maybe not the one you were taught, but if it occurs in English literature, it is not faulty. Chapman's translation of Odyssey is very clearly English literature.

    One more check, "the epithete Peevish":

    https://books.google.fr/books?id=09R...ete%22&f=false

    Since William Laud is an Anglican, that is one of your own Classics.
    __________________________________________________ ___

    II "but sometimes presumably too because certain people involved in somewhat shrinkish behaviour might be trying to figure me out."

    Quote Originally Posted by thewriteranon View Post
    The first half of this sentence makes some sense even if it is relatively awkward English, but I get lost here. What on earth did you mean by "shrinkish?" That's not an English word.
    Here is the full sentence, you were starting in second half:

    "I am very well aware people are not hanging over my EVERY post, I see that certain posts are viewed over and over again, presumably because of polemic content, mostly, but sometimes presumably too because certain people involved in somewhat shrinkish behaviour might be trying to figure me out."

    1) Key word: certain posts are viewed over and over again, presumably ... but presumably too ...

    That means that words both stated and left out in the part beginning "but presumably too because" refer to the reason why a certain post is viewed over and over again, and that words left out in that second half shall be supplemented from first half. You never took Latin as an option very far, did you?

    2) Shrinkish - my donation to OED! From "shrink" derogatory for psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, psychologist etc, originally "headshrinker" [see also Amazonas Indians] + ending -ish, here in sense "exhibiting behaviour of" root word etc.

    Since both components are very clear, I thought the derivation would be so too.

    3) Example of what I mean. My extra-site guestbook is down. I made a post as backup guestbook, and it has SO many views. Three theories on why:
    a) someone with a somewhat shrinkish behaviour is trying to figure me out, what kind of geek can come up with a "back up guest book";
    b) someone is watching WHO might write entries in my guestbook (perhaps same people who proably manually and from very few computers spammed my real guestbook which has now been down for very long);
    c) that particular post could have been used to generate stats - but most often the stats from that post (only on one of my blogs, since I link to that one from other blogs) are outweighed by those from other ones.

    __________________________________________________ ___

    III "I mean, readers could be often from the networks which are into that jargon, and who would of course want to make your point realistic."

    Quote Originally Posted by thewriteranon View Post
    This one really got me. What jargon? "That" jargon? What is this relative pronoun referring to? What networks? Make his point...realistic?
    Context is gold:

    "A reason not to consider lack of comments as necessarily denoting lack of reading. I mean, readers could be often from the networks which are into that jargon, and who would of course want to make your point realistic."

    I mean the jargon of "you ain't no comments, you ain't no readers". This should make the rest clear.
    __________________________________________________ _______

    Feel free to consider some of the things I said as ... conspiracy theories ... but you have hardly made a case for "garbled sentences which don't make sense".

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    Quote Originally Posted by thewriteranon View Post
    Not just the its/it's. You're using a singular word to refer to plural readers, even if it is a singular category. The sentence reads awkwardly. It should be something more like, "Not sure they are the best readers, but they have not stopped reading." ("Begun and not quit" is just silly phraseology).

    Dude, I'm trying to help. One of the issues with people who learn to speak second and third languages is that native speakers are often too polite to correct minute pieces of grammar because aw they're trying. But you don't get better until you start getting corrected on more than the basic concepts.

    Also, "ellipsis" is used to refer to the three dots used in the omission of words, not just omission of words.
    1) I used sg because the subject "some" came later. Perhaps a REAL fault and interference with my native Swedish. Some have looked for my faulty English like for a needle in the haystack, and you have found the needle!

    Admirations!

    2) When I try to help someone out on grammar, like on FB or on a forum where a PM is possible, I do so per PM - not on a discussion where it clogs the context for other issues, usually. This time you did however give a real hand by the other analyses, where I could show that I am not as much of a beginner as you thought.

    3) Ellipsis first of all means leaving out a word, usually which can be understood from context. Ellipsis secondly also means showing that you leave out the rest or leave out a bit, by the three dots.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cow Poke View Post
    I just saw a commercial for that weird preacher "Prince" (Joseph Prince?) who is advertising his book (or video or something) and his closing statement had some weird verb agreement problem -- seems like somebody should have helped him on that before publishing.
    For someone not considering me decent, you are helpful. Thank you for pointing out that unlike what certain networks seem to have been implying about my ambition, my English or French (both foreign languages) does not have to be totally faultless for a publication in commercial format to be possible.

  7. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Bad Pig View Post
    Upon reflection, JPH is correct.
    For getting here right?

    Nutso much what he meant, since he had made the judgement earlier.

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    tWebber thewriteranon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hansgeorg View Post

    2) When I try to help someone out on grammar, like on FB or on a forum where a PM is possible, I do so per PM - not on a discussion where it clogs the context for other issues, usually. This time you did however give a real hand by the other analyses, where I could show that I am not as much of a beginner as you thought.
    Actually, I never said or implied you were a beginner. In fact, I was trying to imply that you are past the point of beginner correction, because native speakers will correct big issues, but not smaller issues.

    "Fire is catching. If we burn, you burn with us!"
    "I'm not going anywhere. I'm going to stay here and cause all kinds of trouble."
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    tWebber thewriteranon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hansgeorg View Post
    I have drawn lines between the examples to not jumble it all together, starting each with your quote of me, then your comment, then my clarification.
    I'm only cutting out the rest because I only wish to respond to epithet. Epithet may have been spelled with two Es in some old writings but that is because English did not have universal spelling before the modern era. Lots of words were spelled in a variety of ways, for example, at the time of the founding fathers in the eighteenth century. That does not mean it is the current spelling. I mean, if you want to spell like an 18th century Englishman, whatevs.

    ETA: you may be wanting for a division between regular and final S, though. You could always use f for your regular S.

    "Fire is catching. If we burn, you burn with us!"
    "I'm not going anywhere. I'm going to stay here and cause all kinds of trouble."
    Katniss Everdeen


    Christ our Passover has been sacrificed for us. Therefore let us keep the feast.


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    Quote Originally Posted by thewriteranon View Post
    I'm only cutting out the rest because I only wish to respond to epithet. Epithet may have been spelled with two Es in some old writings but that is because English did not have universal spelling before the modern era. Lots of words were spelled in a variety of ways, for example, at the time of the founding fathers in the eighteenth century. That does not mean it is the current spelling. I mean, if you want to spell like an 18th century Englishman, whatevs.
    Thank you so humbly! :)

    Quote Originally Posted by thewriteranon View Post
    ETA: you may be wanting for a division between regular and final S, though. You could always use f for your regular S.
    No, I can't.

    Spelling and ductus are two things and I find it horrid when f is used instead of the long s.

    Sorry for not living up to expectations ... :/

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    Quote Originally Posted by thewriteranon View Post
    Actually, I never said or implied you were a beginner. In fact, I was trying to imply that you are past the point of beginner correction, because native speakers will correct big issues, but not smaller issues.
    Sorry for misunderstanding.

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