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Thread: How do you want your body disposed of after you die?

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    tWebber
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    How do you want your body disposed of after you die?

    Most of us just don't want to think about death, but as surely as you were born you will die. I once had 4 sons, my youngest died just short of his 22nd birthday. My 2nd eldest died a couple of months after his 31st birthday. Death is no respecter of age...

    So as to not inconvenience 'your' surviving family 'you' really should contemplate what 'you' want to be done with your body after you die. The cheapest option is to leave it to science to do whatever they would do.

    Alternatively, 'you' should contemplate allowing organ harvest after you have died. When that is done the body would be released for collection. So then what?

    If you happen to be Muslim or like then there aren't any options, your body has to be wrapped and put in the ground ASAP. Of interest: organ harvesting is permitted, but autopsy is prohibited.
    Muslim Funeral Traditions

    For most of us, we have several options. The most common are: cremation, full body burial in the ground, full body internment in a crypt or dropped into the ocean...

    Whilst when I die, I'll be dead and won't know what is happening to my body, whilst I'm still alive I'm not keen on the thought of being eaten by worms or fish, nor am I keen on the idea of rotting away in a crypt, so despite its ecological problems, like the majority of people in the world, I'll opt for cremation. In terms of land usage it is the most economical. Even more so if your ashes are scattered somewhere.

    I'm RCC but am at odds with the Popes latest prohibitions concerning the remains of the dead. Officially, "Cremated remains must be buried, just like a body, in a cemetery, crypt, or other appropriate burial place. Scattering ashes or keeping them at home is not permitted" . Poooha, I say, remembering that for centuries the Church prohibited cremation and it has only been permitted since 1963 on the condition that "it does not demonstrate a denial of faith in the resurrection of the body”.
    Changing Catholic Attitudes about Cremation

    Of interest to me: the Romans, at times, after killing Christians would burn the bodies thinking that surviving Christians would be discouraged with the thought that the Romans had denied their friends any chance of a bodily resurrection. Poooha, I say, the God of Abraham, Isaac & Jacob is not that impotent!

    One final thing to consider: worldwide there is a huge problem with finding space to bury the dead. The old ideas about Cemetary as a Necopolis (city of the dead) have had their day. Cities of the living need open space and trees. Think about the planning problems Sydney, NSW, Australia is having to confront...ithe same problems might be confronting your authorities...
    Housing the dead: what happens when a city runs out of space?

    I guess people need a place to mourn and a place to fixate on. I'll leave it up to whoever survives me. I might suggest they ask the local council for permission to dig a hole in a park, put my ashes in it and plant a tree on top and if they need to, at some stage nail a little plaque to the tree after it has grown a bit. Alternatively, just scatter my ashes in a flower bed or put them in the garbage bin. I won't care. I'll be dead! :

    My youngest son requested that his ashes be scattered in the water at a beach over Manly way. So that is what I did and a great crowd of his friends came to say a final farewell...

    I didn't know what my 2nd eldest son wanted, but he loved to surf down the south coast. So I scattered his ashes amoungst the waves.

    There is an old saying in my family: we shed one tear for the departed and a hundred for ourselves. When you do your planning for your demise keep in mind those that will survive 'you'...
    Last edited by elam; 01-07-2017 at 07:01 AM.

  2. Amen mossrose, guacamole amen'd this post.
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    tWebber Mountain Man's Avatar
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    I've always appreciated the Klingon philosophy: "It is an empty shell. Treat it as such."

  4. Amen mossrose, Jedidiah amen'd this post.
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    Troll Magnet Sparko's Avatar
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    I leave it up to those who are left. I think the body should be respected though, since it represents the person and who will be resurrected one day.

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    Oops........... mossrose's Avatar
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    I have stipulated in my will that my body is to be donated to science and/or organ transplant. My husband and children are aware of this, and at least the kids are fine. Although my daughter informed me recently that she heard of someone who's remains had been returned to the family after 8 years.

    I told her if that happened, just cremate the rest and do whatever they like with those remains. I don't think it is lawful here to scatter ashes, so they would likely be buried. It is certainly more economical to bury a small container than a body-holding casket, and takes up less space. Both my parents were cremated and are in the same small space at the cemetery, with one marker.

    My body is merely housing my soul. And regarding cremation versus burial, I believe that the same Creator who made me from dust can raise me again from dust.


    Securely anchored to the Rock amid every storm of trial, testing or tribulation.

  7. Amen Cow Poke, DesertBerean, elam amen'd this post.
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    tWebber
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    Please wait until I have passed away before getting rid of my body. Then cremation is okay

  9. Amen mossrose, stfoskey15, guacamole amen'd this post.
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    Must...have...caffeine One Bad Pig's Avatar
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    In Orthodoxy, the general rule is that if a person is cremated, then they are denied Christian burial and commemorative services; it is seen as a sign of disrespect to a body that will one day rise again.

    It is not all that unusual for the body of a saint to remain without decay.
    Enter the Church and wash away your sins. For here there is a hospital and not a court of law. Do not be ashamed to enter the Church; be ashamed when you sin, but not when you repent. – St. John Chrysostom

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  11. Amen JB DoulosChristou amen'd this post.
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    Dept. of Redundancy Dept. Cow Poke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Bad Pig View Post
    In Orthodoxy, the general rule is that if a person is cremated, then they are denied Christian burial and commemorative services; it is seen as a sign of disrespect to a body that will one day rise again.
    Interesting.

    It is not all that unusual for the body of a saint to remain without decay.
    Not arguing, just curious -- what are some examples of this?

    1 Tim 2:5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.

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    tWebber EvoUK's Avatar
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    My family have always had the opinion that you do everything you can when you're alive, then when you're dead it doesn't matter anymore.

    Hense my mother (a huge animal lover) will spend small fortunes on pets if they're unwell, but when they've died she'll chuck the remains in the bin or leave them at the vets (obviously she's upset, but the body isn't relevant).

    When my father died we had a small funeral, then the body was taken off to be cremated, but we didn't see the need to go.

    More relevant to the topic though- I'm donating all my organs etc, so they can take what is of use, then the rest they'll probably cremate I suppose.

  14. Amen stfoskey15 amen'd this post.
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    Theologyweb's Official Grandfather Jedidiah's Avatar
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    I would really like to have my body left in the woods to be disposed of by the elements. But I really do not care, I won't be there.
    Micah 6:8 He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?

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    Must...have...caffeine One Bad Pig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cow Poke View Post
    Interesting.



    Not arguing, just curious -- what are some examples of this?
    St. Spyridon (a participant in the First Council of Nicaea) is incorrupt; so is St. Sabas, a sixth-century monk near Jerusalem. More recently, St. John the Chozebite (reposed 1960) was found to be incorrupt and sweet-smelling 20 years later. I've seen the relics of the latter two saints.

    On a much shorter timescale, when my bishop +Metropolitan Nicholas reposed in 2011, his body was not embalmed in any way (he was prepared for burial by priests, not by a funeral parlor), it was a week before he was buried, yet the body did not decay at all in that time.
    Enter the Church and wash away your sins. For here there is a hospital and not a court of law. Do not be ashamed to enter the Church; be ashamed when you sin, but not when you repent. – St. John Chrysostom

    Veritas vos Liberabit<>< Learn Greek <>< Look here for an Orthodox Church in America<><Ancient Faith Radio

    I recommend you do not try too hard and ...research as little as possible. Such weighty things give me a headache. - Shunyadragon, Baha'i apologist

  17. Amen JB DoulosChristou amen'd this post.

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