Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 13 of 13

Thread: You say Shabbat. I say Shabbos.

  1. #11
    tWebber Marta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Midwest
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    215
    Amen (Given)
    4
    Amen (Received)
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by DesertBerean View Post
    I take it this is Orthodox only? Not reformed or Hassidic (sp)?
    Not to be confusing but when I started - and like any branch of Christianity, in regards to the interpretation of scripture, there are variations but a main foundation. You have to really find the happy medium to sound scripture (when studying) and what bible you feel comfortable with, as there are quite a few out there. Hope this is understandable.
    Psalm 69, "13 But I pray to you, Lord, in the time of your favor; in your great love, O God,
    answer me with your sure salvation."

  2. #12
    tWebber Marta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Midwest
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    215
    Amen (Given)
    4
    Amen (Received)
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by DesertBerean View Post
    Lol. Hasn't changed much since the Old Testament.
    Wasn't suppose to....from what I understood.
    Psalm 69, "13 But I pray to you, Lord, in the time of your favor; in your great love, O God,
    answer me with your sure salvation."

  3. Amen DesertBerean amen'd this post.
  4. #13
    tWebber Marta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Midwest
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    215
    Amen (Given)
    4
    Amen (Received)
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by DesertBerean View Post
    Lol. Hasn't changed much since the Old Testament.

    Bereishit (at the beginning) Genesis (the traditional Greek name for the first and best-known book of the Bible is Genesis, meaning "origin")

    Sh'mot (names) Exodus (The Exodus (from Greek ἔξοδος exodos, "going out" from Egypt)

    Vayikra (and He called, or Sefer Vayyikra, or in English, the book of Leviticus. Vayyikra is translated “And He called out”) Leviticus

    Bamidbar (in the wilderness) Numbers, The Book of Numbers (from Greek Ἀριθμοί, Arithmoi; Hebrew: בְּמִדְבַּר‎, Bəmiḏbar, "In the desert [of]")

    D'varim (words) Deuteronomy (The Book of Deuteronomy (from Ancient Greek: Δευτερονόμιον, Deuteronómion, "second law"; Hebrew: דְּבָרִים‎, Devārīm, "[spoken] words")

    I love the explanation above, and He called, in the wilderness - words. Very simple – in the New Testament, God reveals His word and as John 1 stated it, “The Word Became Flesh”. Isn't that how God makes Himself know throughout the Old and the New?

    Torah isn’t old – as defined, it is a book of instructions in order to know and understand the path in which to walk, Jewish Written Law. **add on**

    The Septuagint rendered the Hebrew torah by the Greek nomos ("law"), probably in the sense of a living network of traditions and customs of a people. The designation of the Torah by nomos, and by its Latin successor lex (whence, "the Law"), has historically given rise to the misunderstanding that Torah means legalism.


    In Genesis (Bereishit (at the beginning)) declares that man was separated from God through sin (Genesis 3), and the New Testament declares that man can be restored in his relationship to God (Romans 3—6). So in some respect it is a continuation, and this can be compared with Abraham relationship with God and with Moses: Truth is seldom revealed all at one time and place (see Ephesians 2:8-10; 5:32). It is gradually unfolded, through time.

    We are also told that God brought Abram from Ur of the Chaldeans to Canaan (Genesis 15:7; Nehemiah 9:7). It is the inspired words of Stephen, however, which indicate that Abram’s first call came to him while he was in Ur: The God of glory appeared to our forefather Abraham when he was in Mesopotamia, before he settled in Haran.

    (Moses does not wish to emphasize this fact about Abram. He tells us only what he needs to do to develop his argument, and from that point on “love covers a multitude of sins.” And where, is this repeated (Moses and I think I marked that passage, “James 5:19-20 My brothers, if anyone among you wanders from the truth and someone brings him back, let him know that whoever brings back a sinner from his wandering will save his soul from death and will cover a multitude of sins.)

    Therefore we must say that the “call” of Abram in Genesis 12:1-3 is really his “second call,” something like Jonah’s second commission to go to Nineveh (Jonah 1:1-2; 3:1-2). The difference is that Jonah refused to go where God told him and went in the opposite direction. Abram was providentially brought part way to Canaan, though he seems passive in this, rather than acting out of obedience.

    Comparatively – God starts to open the relationship from Genesis 12 to Genesis 18, in order to make Himself known. In Exodus, the same thing - God first doesn’t reveal himself right away but slowly opens that relationship up to Moses until Exodus 33, 8 Then Moses said, "I pray You, show me Your glory!" 19And He said, "I Myself will make all My goodness pass before you, and will proclaim the name of the LORD before you; and I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show compassion on whom I will show compassion."


    References:

    Old Testament Studies

    5. Abraham's Call and God's Covenant (Genesis 11:26-17:27)

    What is the difference between the Torah and the Old Testament?

    Parashat Shemot (Names)
    Last edited by Marta; 02-22-2017 at 06:32 PM.
    Psalm 69, "13 But I pray to you, Lord, in the time of your favor; in your great love, O God,
    answer me with your sure salvation."

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •