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Thread: Different Approaches to Doing Philosophy?

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    tWebber
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    Different Approaches to Doing Philosophy?

    Doing philosophy involves evaluating arguments and checking to see if one's assumptions have a good justification concerning ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and so on. I wonder if there are different approaches of doing philosophy. There are philosophers who are Christians and they have the desire to not advocate anything that would contradict biblical teaching. Non-Christian philosophers don't care if they contradict the Bible.

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    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaxb View Post
    Doing philosophy involves evaluating arguments and checking to see if one's assumptions have a good justification concerning ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and so on. I wonder if there are different approaches of doing philosophy. There are philosophers who are Christians and they have the desire to not advocate anything that would contradict biblical teaching. Non-Christian philosophers don't care if they contradict the Bible.
    First, I am not certain that all Christian philosophers 'desire to not advocate any thing that would (contradict?) Biblical teaching.' I will check further on this.

    I believe the skeptical Socratic Philosophy does not follow the above criteria for philosophy. The Socratic would be more questioning everything even that which appears logic. It does not preclude 'believing' things, but it does include a less biased view of even equally questioning ones own beliefs and logic. The extreme view in Philosophy would be would be 'Radical Skepticism.'
    Last edited by shunyadragon; 03-23-2017 at 06:29 AM.
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    tWebber 37818's Avatar
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    All philosophies have starting premises. All views have premises. Premises being presuppositions. One`s own language is part of it.
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    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 37818 View Post
    All philosophies have starting premises. All views have premises. Premises being presuppositions. One`s own language is part of it.
    Probably true to an extent, but too simplistic a generalization for ALL philosophies to be meaningful. It depends in what you consider premises, and needs more explanation. Many starting premises and presuppositions lead to circular arguments.

    One more comment on skeptical philosophies. Various forms of skepticism question in one way or another that claims of 'true belief' have sufficient objective reasons (presuppositions) for that belief. Skeptics claim that it is not possible to have an adequate justification based on assumptions of belief nor non-belief. Part of the objections by skeptics is that contrary and conflicting arguments can lead to logical conclusions based different assumptions and presuppositions, which are not based on objective verifiable evidence. Skeptical philosophies range from 'Mitigated Skepticism' like that of David Hume to Radical Skepticism.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

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    tWebber
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    Quote Originally Posted by shunyadragon View Post
    First, I am not certain that all Christian philosophers 'desire to not advocate any thing that would (contradict?) Biblical teaching.' I will check further on this.

    I believe the skeptical Socratic Philosophy does not follow the above criteria for philosophy. The Socratic would be more questioning everything even that which appears logic. It does not preclude 'believing' things, but it does include a less biased view of even equally questioning ones own beliefs and logic. The extreme view in Philosophy would be would be 'Radical Skepticism.'
    It would be odd for a professing Christian to not care whether his beliefs contradict the Bible.

    Yes, the skeptical Socratic Philosophy would question everything.

    The Christian philosopher would seek to find justification for all of his beliefs including his belief that the Bible is the word of God.

  6. Amen 37818 amen'd this post.
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    tWebber Carrikature's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaxb View Post
    Doing philosophy involves evaluating arguments and checking to see if one's assumptions have a good justification concerning ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and so on. I wonder if there are different approaches of doing philosophy. There are philosophers who are Christians and they have the desire to not advocate anything that would contradict biblical teaching. Non-Christian philosophers don't care if they contradict the Bible.
    If they're evaluating arguments against a desired conclusion, it's not philosophy.

    There aren't different approaches to philosophy, no. The basic system of "does A lead to B" works regardless of what A and B are. You could, however, insert any manner of unprovable premises that still lead to a given conclusion. That pushes you away from sound arguments into valid only, which kinda defeats the point imo.
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    tWebber Carrikature's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaxb View Post
    The Christian philosopher would seek to find justification for all of his beliefs including his belief that the Bible is the word of God.
    Then they're looking for apologetics, not philosophy.
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    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carrikature View Post
    Then they're looking for apologetics, not philosophy.
    I consider your definition of philosophy too narrow. Epistemology, and apologetics would be considered a Branch of Philosophy in the Philosophy of Religion.
    Last edited by shunyadragon; 03-23-2017 at 11:37 AM.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

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    tWebber
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaxb View Post
    Doing philosophy involves evaluating arguments and checking to see if one's assumptions have a good justification concerning ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and so on. I wonder if there are different approaches of doing philosophy. There are philosophers who are Christians and they have the desire to not advocate anything that would contradict biblical teaching. Non-Christian philosophers don't care if they contradict the Bible.
    There is another way to look at philosophy?...the use of language (and its rules) to articulate and make sense of "reality"---questions such as who are "we"/humans, why are we "here"/in this reality, what is our purpose/meaning, what is the "good" life?....etc. Therefore, science (and its methods) and philosophy are complementary. Both assist our attempts to understand "reality".

    as to evaluation---there are aspects of philosophy and science that are objective---such as the rules of that particular language or the methods or math used in science...but there are also areas that are subjective. The starting paradigm/world-view will color the interpretations and therefore the conclusion one arrives at.

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