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Thread: Buddha and Blaming the Victim

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    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
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    Buddha and Blaming the Victim

    My biggest issue with buddhism is that the whole 'stop desiring to stop suffering' strikes me as very much blaming the victim. It has similarities with 'thou shalt not covet' - and in the limited sense of learning contentment actually has merit. But my understanding is that buddhism takes it to the logical extreme - eliminate all desire and you eliminate all suffering.

    Suffering, then, in buddhist understanding must be a matter of perception. Eliminating the desire for food would not stop starvation - but it might make one mind it less. Seems to be 'suffering is a state of mind' thing.

    I find it a very, very poor answer to suffering. Sure, the individual can, presumably, learn to disregard desire and therefore the suffering, I suppose - but it still ends up telling the starving child 'Sweetie, the problem isn't that you don't have food - it's that you desire food'. Blaming the victim for their suffering while trying to take control of one's own suffering.

    What I really don't get is what makes this so attractive?

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    tWebber TheWall's Avatar
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    I have a similar problem with karma.

    Whose debt am I paying?

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    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
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    And how exactly do you get paid back?

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    Professor KingsGambit's Avatar
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    My issue with Buddhism is more along the lines of: why should we accept the musings of Siddartha when he did not appeal to any divine revelation or give us any real reason to accept the claims?
    Do not say, “Why were the old days better than these?”
    For it is not wise to ask such questions. - Ecclesiastes 7:10

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    tWebber
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    I am not a Buddhist, my opinions may be biased....

    Concepts get lost in translation---
    The word Dukka refers to the pain/dissatisfaction an individual feels....and Buddhism explores the psychology of (emotional) pain and tries to find solutions.

    https://www.thoughtco.com/life-is-su...at-mean-450094
    The Buddha taught there are three main categories of dukkha. These are:

    Suffering or pain (dukkha-dukkha)
    Impermanence or change (viparinama-dukkha)
    Conditioned states (samkhara-dukkha)


    Dharma --- is "law" or way of life---and this begins by understanding what is "life".
    http://www.zen-buddhism.net/buddhist...le-truths.html

    ...The other problem pointed out by Buddha here, which is very pertinent, is that denying desire (or depriving oneself) is like denying life itself. A person, he said, has to rise above attachments and for that, he need not deprive himself. The problem arises when he does not know where to put an end to his desires. And when he yields into his desires, he becomes a slave to them.

    Buddha stated that to put an end to suffering, we need to control our desires or practice non-attachment. This may sound difficult but can be achieved through diligent practice.
    This liberation from attachment and sorrow frees the mind of all troubles and worries. The attainment of this liberation is called "Nirvana" in Sanskrit


    Dharma---law/way of life (eightfold path)
    1) Right perspective (belief)
    2) Right thought
    3) Right speech
    4) Right action
    5) Right livelihood
    6) Right effort
    7) Right mindfulness
    8) Right concentration
    http://www.zen-buddhism.net/buddhist...fold-path.html

    As a Muslim, I would say, the appeal of Buddhism is that it offers the answer to the question---How do I live a good life?---the answer is Dharma

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    Troll Magnet Sparko's Avatar
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    Moderated By: Sparko

    moved to comp religions

    ***If you wish to take issue with this notice DO NOT do so in this thread.***
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    tWebber 37818's Avatar
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    Dharma---law/way of life (eightfold path)
    1) Right perspective (belief)
    2) Right thought
    3) Right speech
    4) Right action
    5) Right livelihood
    6) Right effort
    7) Right mindfulness
    8) Right concentration
    The "Right perspective (belief)" entails believing in the 4 noble truths.
    The "Right effort" entails living the 8 fold path.

    The 4 noble truths in short:
    1. Suffering is universal.
    2. Know the cause of suffering.
    3. Know how to eliminate the cause of suffering.
    4. Eliminate the cause of suffering by living the 8 fold path.

    Just the 10th commandment, Thou shalt not covet, deals with this, in short, I think.
    . . . the Gospel of Christ, for it is [the] power of God to salvation to every [one] believing, . . . -- Romans 1:16.

    . . . that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures: . . . -- 1 Corinthians 15:3, 4.

    Whosoever believeth that Jesus is the Christ is born of God: . . . -- 1 John 5:1.

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    Troll Magnet Sparko's Avatar
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    The bible pretty much promises suffering in this life.

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    tWebber 37818's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparko View Post
    The bible pretty much promises suffering in this life.
    John 16:33,
    . . . These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world. . . .


    Not coveting does not remove this, does it?

    Jesus listing laws relating people to people to the rich young ruler. That was the one He did not mention, for which the rich young ruler said he followed all of them from his youth. Then Jesus suggested that he should sell all that he had. (Luke 18:18-22.)
    . . . the Gospel of Christ, for it is [the] power of God to salvation to every [one] believing, . . . -- Romans 1:16.

    . . . that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures: . . . -- 1 Corinthians 15:3, 4.

    Whosoever believeth that Jesus is the Christ is born of God: . . . -- 1 John 5:1.

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    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by siam View Post
    I am not a Buddhist, my opinions may be biased....

    Concepts get lost in translation---
    The word Dukka refers to the pain/dissatisfaction an individual feels....and Buddhism explores the psychology of (emotional) pain and tries to find solutions.

    https://www.thoughtco.com/life-is-su...at-mean-450094
    The Buddha taught there are three main categories of dukkha. These are:

    Suffering or pain (dukkha-dukkha)
    Impermanence or change (viparinama-dukkha)
    Conditioned states (samkhara-dukkha)


    Dharma --- is "law" or way of life---and this begins by understanding what is "life".
    http://www.zen-buddhism.net/buddhist...le-truths.html

    ...The other problem pointed out by Buddha here, which is very pertinent, is that denying desire (or depriving oneself) is like denying life itself. A person, he said, has to rise above attachments and for that, he need not deprive himself. The problem arises when he does not know where to put an end to his desires. And when he yields into his desires, he becomes a slave to them.

    Buddha stated that to put an end to suffering, we need to control our desires or practice non-attachment. This may sound difficult but can be achieved through diligent practice.
    This liberation from attachment and sorrow frees the mind of all troubles and worries. The attainment of this liberation is called "Nirvana" in Sanskrit


    Dharma---law/way of life (eightfold path)
    1) Right perspective (belief)
    2) Right thought
    3) Right speech
    4) Right action
    5) Right livelihood
    6) Right effort
    7) Right mindfulness
    8) Right concentration
    http://www.zen-buddhism.net/buddhist...fold-path.html

    As a Muslim, I would say, the appeal of Buddhism is that it offers the answer to the question---How do I live a good life?---the answer is Dharma
    Thank you, I appreciate the thoughtful reply. I'm not sure I'm following it correctly - let me give it some more thought and get back to you.

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