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Thread: Buddha and Blaming the Victim

  1. #11
    tWebber
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    Both Buddhism and Christianity can be seen in the context of the previous religion that gave birth to it....in both Judaism and Hinduism, one is born into the religious system---in Judaism, one is born a Jew and in Hinduism, one is born into the (Hindu) caste. In this context, Buddhism and Christianity both made worship/religion more inclusive.

    One difference between some types of Buddhism and some Christianities may be that in Christianity, the Eternal God's perfection is celebrated, In Buddhism, the fragility, (impermenance) and imperfections of humanity and creation is celebrated.

    The Mandala(sand art) is the the way this philosophy is expressed in ritual
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10084L3Pqsc

    In Japan, this is understood as the aesthetics of wabi sabi (rustic-ness)
    here is one way the philosophy works in everyday items through the repair of broken ceramics (Kintsugi) and what it says about human nature....
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lT55_u8URU0

  2. #12
    tWebber Carrikature's Avatar
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    The course I had on religions discussed Buddhism's reference to 'desire' as 'grasping'.

    As I understand it, desire isn't meant to refer to basic human needs. It refers to wanting things beyond the basic satisfaction of those needs. You need shelter. That's not desire. Desire is wanting a big house with lots of rooms. You need food. Desire is wanting a lot of food ready at any time, or only high quality meals, etc.

    The usage of 'grasping' fits a lot better here, in my opinion. You're grasping for things beyond your need (and probably beyond your reach). My wife, for example, went through a period where she needed to be in control of everything. Naturally, this is impossible to achieve. Even so, the more she failed to control, the more she fought for control. It only ended up making her (and everyone around her) miserable. Eliminating the desire eliminates the frustration (suffering) felt at failing. It involved a fair bit of self-reflection as well, and some level of coming to terms with inability to control life.
    I'm not here anymore.

  3. Amen Jedidiah amen'd this post.
  4. #13
    tWebber Carrikature's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingsGambit View Post
    My issue with Buddhism is more along the lines of: why should we accept the musings of Siddartha when he did not appeal to any divine revelation or give us any real reason to accept the claims?
    At its core, a religion can be seen as a set of beliefs which explain a few fundamental concepts: 1) the human 'predicament', 2) why we find ourselves in this predicament, and 3) how to get out of the predicament. The first concept is more or less a given, though the descriptions may vary. The second and third are paired together. Buddhism's "desire = suffering" is a formulation of those two concepts. The "real reason to accept the claims" boils down to how well the claims resonate with the individual.

    As for divine revelation, that only works if the listener already accepts the source as divine. The appeal to divine revelation does not in itself increase the likelihood that a given claim is true.
    I'm not here anymore.

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