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Thread: 2017's global temperatures

  1. #41
    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheLurch View Post
    I think, in retrospect, i wasn't clear in my initial argument. My idea was not that the education system of the time influenced science education today, but that it influenced the cultural environment, setting the stage for one where you could be considered culturally literate without knowing any science (even as science became one of the biggest influences on culture). So i wasn't actually focusing on the current education system at all.

    Unfortunately, i stopped paying attention to the bigger picture when i responded to your post.
    Ah, okay.

    I admit, now I'm a bit unsure what exactly you mean here. Science is taught at almost all levels of education - it's impossible to get through the US system without any science at all. I kinda get what you're saying - even agree in part - but you don't usually use a lot of hyperbole so I'm not sure if you mean degree or literally none.

    I'm not even sure it would be fully true for a classical education in all but the earliest periods.

    Or maybe I'm just over reading here...

  2. #42
    tWebber TheLurch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teallaura View Post
    Ah, okay.

    I admit, now I'm a bit unsure what exactly you mean here. Science is taught at almost all levels of education - it's impossible to get through the US system without any science at all. I kinda get what you're saying - even agree in part - but you don't usually use a lot of hyperbole so I'm not sure if you mean degree or literally none.

    I'm not even sure it would be fully true for a classical education in all but the earliest periods.

    Or maybe I'm just over reading here...
    Let me try again:

    My argument is that part of the reason we don't do a good job with science education is that we as a culture are very accepting of scientific illiteracy. That's the Shakespeare vs. quantum mechanics part of things.

    I'd suggest it might go back a couple of centuries, to where being well-read and educated meant knowing the Greek and Roman classics, but didn't include knowledge of the natural world. That was reflected in the education system of the time, and (to some extent) persists today, though mostly at the college level.

    Any impact on primary education is indirect, in the sense that we accept scientific illiteracy, and don't try as hard as we should to fix the education system.

  3. #43
    tWebber
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheLurch View Post
    Let me try again:

    My argument is that part of the reason we don't do a good job with science education is that we as a culture are very accepting of scientific illiteracy. That's the Shakespeare vs. quantum mechanics part of things.

    I'd suggest it might go back a couple of centuries, to where being well-read and educated meant knowing the Greek and Roman classics, but didn't include knowledge of the natural world. That was reflected in the education system of the time, and (to some extent) persists today, though mostly at the college level.

    Any impact on primary education is indirect, in the sense that we accept scientific illiteracy, and don't try as hard as we should to fix the education system.
    Not only are we accepting of scientific illiteracy, we can be out and out hostile to scientific or mathematical competance. We value great sports stars over great physicists or mathematicians. The smart young man or women that might one day make some great scientific discovery is routinely mocked and berated through the primary and secondary schooling unless they also happen to possess above average looks and athletic skills.

    Jim
    Jorge's trueorigins paper: "...it is known that other volcanic features match what is usually associated with impact craters including ... shatter cones and crystal deformations"

    Planetary Science Institute: "Shatter cones … are found in only two places on Earth, 1) in nuclear test sites and 2) meteorite impact structures. They are formed as a result of the high pressure, high velocity shock wave ...

    maximum pressures from 45 to 200 times greater than found in volcanic events (2->20 Gpa)

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