Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 38

Thread: How Many of the "Spree Shooters" Came from Broken Homes?

  1. #1
    See, the Thing is... Cow Poke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Republic of Texas
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    45,471
    Amen (Given)
    9765
    Amen (Received)
    22019

    How Many of the "Spree Shooters" Came from Broken Homes?

    I'm just curious... has there been an extensive study on what's "common" in the shooters?

    I remember reading that [whatever] percentage came from broken homes - don't remember the number, but it was very high.

    I don't know if that's a factor or not, I know it is in some of the cases.

    So, what are the almost universally common factors in the backgrounds of the shooters?

    I'd like a serious discussion, so I'm going to ask that JimL not post here, and no sniping.

    1 Tim 2:5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.

  2. #2
    Professor KingsGambit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Next to you
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    9,219
    Amen (Given)
    1489
    Amen (Received)
    3965
    For what was given to everyone for the use of all, you have taken for your exclusive use. The earth belongs not to the rich, but to everyone. - Ambrose, 4th century AD

    All cruelty springs from weakness. - Seneca the Younger

  3. #3
    tWebber Starlight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    New Zealand
    Faith
    Atheist
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    8,155
    Amen (Given)
    2640
    Amen (Received)
    1590
    I would guess the universal common factors are: 1. Having a gun, 2. Being male.

    A couple of year ago I read a few scientific review articles that summarized the current state of research on child-outcomes. The findings indicate there would be a strong correlation between mass shooters and fatherless homes, but not for the reasons you might expect.

    Thousands, or even tens of thousands of studies have been performed and published around the world in the area of child-outcomes and how they relate to family structure. The strong and consistent findings of such studies have been that children need:
    - Love (both toward them and between their caregivers)
    - Stability (lack of major changes including moving house/schools or changes as to who are their caregivers)
    - Safety (physical and emotional safety - no domestic abuse, a healthy home (not filled with mold) etc)
    - Sufficient financial support (caregivers can afford decent clothing, food, decent standard of living for the children)

    But above and beyond those, the studies have consistently found that other variables don't matter - it doesn't matter who the caregivers are (biological parents vs adopted), it doesn't matter if there is only a single caregiver versus 2 caregivers (there are some benefits though if there is a non-parental adult in the home such as an extended-family member). Single mothers who raise the child from birth by themselves and who are financially well-off do just as well at raising kids successfully as married-for-life financially well-off biological parents do. This can be observed across every behavioral or emotional outcome any researcher has ever cared to measure (educational success, grades, subsequent criminal histories, self-reported happiness, parental reports, teacher reports, future job salaries, etc). The findings thus indicate that there is no innate psychological need for boys to have a 'father-figure' (or that if there is such a need, having an actual father in the home makes zero difference and the boys are perfectly capable of seeing father figures modeled by their teachers or preachers or coaches or movie heroes or politicians etc).

    BUT, if a child is being raised by a single mother as opposed to a couple, the chances are much higher that there might:
    - be financial insecurity (one parent is likely to earn less than 2 combined)
    - have been instability (the child may have had to endure a divorce process and related changes in who the child's caregivers were and moving house and schools as a result)
    - have been a lack of love in the home (the caregivers pre-divorce may have been fighting, there may have even been domestic abuse)
    - have been a lack of safety (the father's alcoholism or drug-addiction or violence toward the wife or child may have led to the divorce)

    All those things have negative effects on children and their behavior / life outcomes / criminality / happiness etc. So caregivers going through a divorce process hugely impacts the children negatively. But, of course, not divorcing and staying together isn't better for the child if there is a lack of love in the home, or constant fights between the caregivers, or violence in the home. (So banning divorce isn't a good solution in terms of child outcomes.) But if the divorce process had occurred prior to the child being old enough to remember it, then single parenting is just as good as both parents being there, aside from possible financial issues.

    When considering the issue of what makes people prone to committing a specific criminal behavior (e.g. mass shootings), the standard risk factors for criminal behavior would apply. We would thus expect these shooters to have mostly had childhoods characterized by a lack of love, lack of financial support, lack of emotional and physical safety, and a lack of stability. It does, in fact, from what I can see with regard to some of the recent mass shooters, look like these factors were fairly common in their lives.
    Last edited by Starlight; 02-22-2018 at 06:51 PM.

  4. #4
    tWebber demi-conservative's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    2,625
    Amen (Given)
    114
    Amen (Received)
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by Starlight View Post
    . The findings thus indicate that there is no innate psychological need for boys to have a 'father-figure' (or that if there is such a need, having an actual father in the home makes zero difference
    Trump is basically "Bruce Wayne pretending to be a foppish retarded billionaire" tier genius, in case nerds need a simpler metaphor.

  5. Amen Jedidiah amen'd this post.
  6. #5
    tWebber demi-conservative's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    2,625
    Amen (Given)
    114
    Amen (Received)
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by Cow Poke View Post
    I'm just curious... has there been an extensive study on what's "common" in the shooters?

    I remember reading that [whatever] percentage came from broken homes - don't remember the number, but it was very high.

    I don't know if that's a factor or not, I know it is in some of the cases.

    So, what are the almost universally common factors in the backgrounds of the shooters?

    I'd like a serious discussion, so I'm going to ask that JimL not post here, and no sniping.
    From what demi heard

    1) Broken home
    2) mental problems
    3) relationship problems
    Trump is basically "Bruce Wayne pretending to be a foppish retarded billionaire" tier genius, in case nerds need a simpler metaphor.

  7. #6
    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    In my house.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    12,696
    Amen (Given)
    6034
    Amen (Received)
    4616
    Quote Originally Posted by Cow Poke View Post
    I'm just curious... has there been an extensive study on what's "common" in the shooters?

    I remember reading that [whatever] percentage came from broken homes - don't remember the number, but it was very high.

    I don't know if that's a factor or not, I know it is in some of the cases.

    So, what are the almost universally common factors in the backgrounds of the shooters?

    I'd like a serious discussion, so I'm going to ask that JimL not post here, and no sniping.
    Define 'spree shooter'. Are we counting drive by revenge shootings related to gangs? Why or why not? Off campus killings or only on campus?

    The problem is teens killing others as a solution to their perceived problems - the mode of killing is incidental to the causality.

    And the killing is the end stage of something else.

    Once that stage is reached, the availability of weapons is an issue - one that only a elimination of the existence of guns altogether could eliminate (yes, I know this is impossible but no guns at all equals no shootings at all) but which reasonable gun control can play a role. Federal guidelines for replacing the current hodge podge being a start.

    But it would be far better if we as a society started dealing with the myriad of social ills that got us to this point.

  8. Amen Adrift amen'd this post.
  9. #7
    See, the Thing is... Cow Poke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Republic of Texas
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    45,471
    Amen (Given)
    9765
    Amen (Received)
    22019
    Quote Originally Posted by Teallaura View Post
    Define 'spree shooter'.
    Any of the shooters involved in the mass shootings - could have made that more clear, but this was from a related subject where somebody (don't remember who) referred to the school shooters (and others) as "spree shooters".

    1 Tim 2:5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.

  10. #8
    tWebber Starlight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    New Zealand
    Faith
    Atheist
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    8,155
    Amen (Given)
    2640
    Amen (Received)
    1590
    Quote Originally Posted by Teallaura View Post
    Define 'spree shooter'.
    Also in need of a definition is 'broken home'. Are adoptive parents a broken home, or a single mother raising the child from birth? Or does the child need to have experienced violence in the home, or experienced a parental divorce for it to be a 'broken home'?

    Obviously the average person doesn't commit crime or violent crime. But if a lot of bad things have happened to the person throughout their life, especially in their childhood, the more likely they are to commit a serious violent crime like a shooting spree. So if, by 'broken home', what is meant is "the home situation is... not good" (neglect, violence, drugs, divorces, alcoholism, poverty, malnutrition etc) then of course such negative factors will predispose a person to criminal behavior such as mass shootings or other violent crime.

  11. #9
    Troll Magnet Sparko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    42,915
    Amen (Given)
    4031
    Amen (Received)
    19567
    Another common factor seems to be the student being rejected, mocked, or bullied by their peers.

  12. #10
    See, the Thing is... Cow Poke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Republic of Texas
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    45,471
    Amen (Given)
    9765
    Amen (Received)
    22019
    Still interested in any actual studies on the backgrounds of the shooters.

    And the premise that I referenced in the OP - that a major percentage of these kids come from broken homes - attempts to point to the failure of the social engineering of the last couple dozen decades.

    I don't want to assume, though -- it just seems prudent that somebody would have had a "let's see what the common factors are" so we can identify future potential shooters. Kinda like a "profiling" in the technical sense.

    1 Tim 2:5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •