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Thread: New Bird/Dinosaur intermediate species found

  1. #51
    tWebber lee_merrill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    For a bit more on potential intermediates from Precambrian to Cambrian organisms

    Source: A Parvancorina-like arthropod from the Cambrian of South China


    Abstract

    Constraining the origin of animal groups is allowed, to some extent, by discoveries of Cambrian Lagerstätten that preserve both mineralizing and nonmineralizing organisms. A new species is reported here of the Cambrian arthropod Skania, which bears an exoskeleton that shares homologies with the Neoproterozoic (Ediacaran) organism Parvancorina and firmly establishes a Precambrian root for arthropods. A new monophyletic group, Parvancorinomorpha, is proposed as the first clade within the arthropod crown group demonstrably ranging across the Neoproterozoic–Paleozoic transition. The Parvancorinomorpha is interpreted to be the sister group of the Arachnomorpha. Incipient cephalization in Skania and related genera represents a step in the progression toward division of a cephalon from a large posterior trunk as shown in Cambrian arachnomorphs such as naraoiids and the addition of a pygidium and thoracic tergites as shown in the arachnomorph clade basal to trilobites. This evidence can serve as a new calibration point for estimating the divergence time for the last common ancestor of arthropods and priapulids based on molecular clock methods.


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    Yet we read here:

    Source: Ediacaran.org

    Parvancorina, from the Latin parva ancora (small anchor), was a small anchor-shaped organism that lived on the Ediacaran seafloor. Parvancorina has been suggested to be an ancestor of living arthropods (the group that includes modern crabs, shrimp and insects), however its phylogenetic placement is uncertain at present.


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    Blessings,
    Lee
    "What I pray of you is, to keep your eye upon Him, for that is everything. Do you say, 'How am I to keep my eye on Him?' I reply, keep your eye off everything else, and you will soon see Him. All depends on the eye of faith being kept on Him. How simple it is!" (J.B. Stoney)

  2. #52
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee_merrill View Post
    Yet we read here:

    Source: Ediacaran.org

    Parvancorina, from the Latin parva ancora (small anchor), was a small anchor-shaped organism that lived on the Ediacaran seafloor. Parvancorina has been suggested to be an ancestor of living arthropods (the group that includes modern crabs, shrimp and insects), however its phylogenetic placement is uncertain at present.


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    Blessings,
    Lee
    As I noted:

    Personally, I agree that the link is still tentative but it is more than sufficient to demonstrate that there is no evidence of intermediaries is hogswallop.

    [*Emphasis added*]

    I'm always still in trouble again

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  3. #53
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee_merrill View Post
    Yet we read here:

    Source: Ediacaran.org

    Parvancorina, from the Latin parva ancora (small anchor), was a small anchor-shaped organism that lived on the Ediacaran seafloor. Parvancorina has been suggested to be an ancestor of living arthropods (the group that includes modern crabs, shrimp and insects), however its phylogenetic placement is uncertain at present.


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    Blessings,
    Lee
    What is wrong with ' phylogenetic placement is uncertain at present'? Are you proposing your SOP selective 'arguing from ignorance.'
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

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  4. #54
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    Another dinosaur bird intermediate found in the raptor family.

    Source: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/150905-animals-sleep-science-dreaming-cats-brains/



    Meet Lori, a tiny dinosaur that may help explain how birds evolved flight

    The chicken-size carnivore from the late Jurassic is already ruffling feathers among paleontologists.

    A fluffy, three-foot-long killer found in Wyoming is the oldest known relative of Velociraptor discovered in North America, paleontologists announced today. Named Hesperornithoides miessleri, the ancient animal is also the smallest dinosaur yet found in the state, which until now has been known for fossils of celebrity behemoths such as Brachiosaurus, Diplodocus, and Stegosaurus.

    The newly described dinosaur, reported today in the journal PeerJ, specifically comes from a layer of roughly 150-million-year-old rocks called the Morrison Formation, which covers a vast swath of the western U.S. centered on Wyoming and Colorado.

    “When you’re working in the Morrison, you’re expecting to only find big stuff—even an isolated vertebra of Diplodocus is almost as big as this entire skeleton,” says study coauthor Dean Lomax, a paleontologist at the University of Manchester in the U.K. This diminutive fossil, he says, “demonstrates that the Morrison Formation was more diverse than previously known … and shows that there were little dinosaurs around.”


    Over a thousand dinosaur species once roamed the Earth. Learn which ones were the largest and the smallest, what dinosaurs ate and how they behaved, as well as surprising facts about their extinction. But the description of Hesperornithoides may ruffle some feathers among paleontologists, as the study authors argue that it hints the first flying ancestors of birds evolved among ground-dwelling dinosaurs, rather than tree-dwelling dinosaurs that could climb and glide.

    Fluffy little murderbird

    Wyoming’s smallest known dinosaur was found by accident during a 2001 fossil dig to uncover the bones of its largest, a 111-foot-long sauropod called Supersaurus. A shovel went through Hesperornithoides’ snout, unfortunately destroying part of it, as surface layers of soil were removed to reach the larger bones of Supersaurus.

    When the dig crew first uncovered the fossil, they thought it might be a pterosaur, a flying reptilian contemporary of the dinosaurs, based on the minute size of the bones. It was only after careful preparation that they realized the find’s full significance.

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    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  5. #55
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    A bony toothed bird 62 million years old is another link between feathered flying dinosaurs and birds.

    Source: http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/protodontopteryx-ruthae-07603.html



    Dubbed Protodontopteryx ruthae, the ancient seabird belongs to Pelagornithidae, an ancient family of bony-toothed birds.

    These seafaring birds were previously known from late Paleocene to Pliocene fossil sites and some species reached wingspans up to 6.4 m (21 feet).

    Protodontopteryx ruthae is the oldest, but smallest member in the family.

    It was only the size of an average gull and, like other pelagornithids, had bony, tooth-like projections on the edge of its beak.

    The partial skeleton of Protodontopteryx ruthae was found by amateur paleontologist Leigh Love at the Waipara Greensand fossil site in 2018.

    “The age of the fossilized bones suggests pelagornithids evolved in the Southern Hemisphere,” said Dr. Paul Scofield, a curator at Canterbury Museum and the senior author of a paper published in the journal Papers in Palaeontology.

    “While this bird was relatively small, the impact of its discovery is hugely significant in our understanding of this family.”

    “Until we found this skeleton, all the really old pelagornithids had been found in the Northern Hemisphere, so everyone thought they’d evolved up there.”

    “New Zealand was a very different place when Protodontopteryx ruthae were in the skies. It had a tropical climate — the sea temperature was about 25 degrees Celsius (77 degrees Fahrenheit) so we had corals and giant turtles.”



    “The discovery of Protodontopteryx ruthae was truly amazing and unexpected,” said co-author Dr. Gerald Mayr, a researcher with the Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum.

    “Not only is the fossil one of the most complete specimens of a pseudotoothed bird, but it also shows a number of unexpected skeletal features that contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of these enigmatic birds.”

    The skeleton of Protodontopteryx ruthae suggests it was less suited for long-distance soaring than later pelagornithids and probably covered much shorter ranges.

    Its short, broad pseudoteeth were likely designed for catching fish. Later species had needle-like pseudoteeth which were likely used to catch soft-bodied prey like squid.

    “Because Protodontopteryx ruthae was less adapted to sustained soaring than other known pelagornithids, we can now say that pseudoteeth evolved before these birds became highly specialized gliders,” said co-author Dr. Vanesa De Pietri, a curator at Canterbury Museum.

    Gerald Mayr et al. Oldest, smallest and phylogenetically most basal pelagornithid, from the early Paleocene of New Zealand, sheds light on the evolutionary history of the largest flying birds. Papers in Palaeontology, published online September 17, 2019; doi: 10.1002/spp2.1284

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    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

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