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Thread: Ancient of Days, Indeed

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    tWebber
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    Ancient of Days, Indeed

    We as Christian's worship a glorified Jew. We believe God is Triune -- localized in heaven -- yet omnipresent, even within us. When we try to visualize this God -- right now -- what do we envision? Perhaps a large "Spirit-being" "sitting" on a "throne" in another dimension, with a physical-ish Jesus seated next to him, meanwhile the Holy Spirit is...hovering around...in the midst of innumerable angels, elders, and saints "glorifying" this invisible God continually. This is literally happening right now.

    This biblical and ancient view of God fits snugly in ancient Jewish minds, perhaps against the backdrop of a three-tiered cosmos or the like. But in our more honest and reflective moments, perhaps we start to experience cognitive dissonance when we internalize the nature of our universe and our place in it. Our modern minds struggle with our reality, our existence, our knowledge, and the one we hold dear and regard as revelatory. Suddenly the God of the bible seems out of place. Here we are with our smartphones in hand, spinning on this pale blue dot in an absurdly vast cosmos, one earth-like planet among billions in one galaxy...among billions...and God is waiting in heaven for the pre-determined time when his glorified sandals will touch down once again in Jerusalem (Acts. 1:11).

    OT scholar Peter Enns shares similar thoughts and struggles in his recent blog post. Check it out and share your thoughts.

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    tWebber
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    I don't see any difference in the way God is comprehended in the Psalms from how I think of God. I say this mainly about the way we comprehend God in his existence in the heavens, since of course, Jesus, having come as God incarnate, adds a new facet to our understanding, a new complexity. But even with Jesus having died and been raised, we still know (and probably in a better way) how God can be beyond creation but a participant within creation at the same time.

    Even the apparent (seemingly) harsh treatments of nations in the Old Testament (and some aspects of wrath, flowing into the New Testament), seem defensible from God's position -- and then knowable by us, to some extent. I see God first as giving us our breath, our existence, without which -- what is there even to speculate about in the case where we didn't exist? It is a gift that we even exist. If this gift required God to take severe actions, we still have come to enjoy the gift of life that we have -- even if life isn't always as grand as we might hope. What is there even to speculate about in the case where we didn't exit?

  3. Amen Scrawly amen'd this post.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhitney View Post
    I don't see any difference in the way God is comprehended in the Psalms from how I think of God. I say this mainly about the way we comprehend God in his existence in the heavens, since of course, Jesus, having come as God incarnate, adds a new facet to our understanding, a new complexity. But even with Jesus having died and been raised, we still know (and probably in a better way) how God can be beyond creation but a participant within creation at the same time.

    Even the apparent (seemingly) harsh treatments of nations in the Old Testament (and some aspects of wrath, flowing into the New Testament), seem defensible from God's position -- and then knowable by us, to some extent. I see God first as giving us our breath, our existence, without which -- what is there even to speculate about in the case where we didn't exist? It is a gift that we even exist. If this gift required God to take severe actions, we still have come to enjoy the gift of life that we have -- even if life isn't always as grand as we might hope. What is there even to speculate about in the case where we didn't exit?
    Thank you for sharing your thoughts, Mike. There is much to resonate with.

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    It seems that your link addressed the problems people face when trying to understand God through scriptures. This could be useful to many people, as an introduction to the explanation or justification of how God has acted to fix things in the world. I think his description is leading to the explanation behind God's actions, as we can possibly discern them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhitney View Post
    It seems that your link addressed the problems people face when trying to understand God through scriptures. This could be useful to many people, as an introduction to the explanation or justification of how God has acted to fix things in the world. I think his description is leading to the explanation behind God's actions, as we can possibly discern them.
    Pete seems to be lamenting the muddled thinking we believers often go through in order to hold on to our beliefs. I think it's healthy to acknowledge this and perhaps even see it as a characteristic of faith itself.

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