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Thread: The Johannine Question

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    tWebber
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    The Johannine Question

    NT scholar Mark Goodacre presented a very brief video on John's use of the synoptics. Goodacre stated that John "creatively embellishes"; "adds new characters and discourses", engaging in "imaginative retelling".

    He goes on to state that throughout much of Christian history GJohn was regarded as a kind of reflection or meditation on the synoptics, which seems to include ahistorical or theological material. OK, so, that seems to be the academic/critical position in a nutshell. Now, I have a question for my Catholic and Orthodox friends:

    Is there an official position on GJohn, or are there a plurality of perspectives on GJohn within Orthodoxy and Catholicism? If there is an official position on GJohn, does it line up with the critical/academic position as laid out by Mark Goodacre?

    Thank you.

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    Must...have...caffeine One Bad Pig's Avatar
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    The only official Orthodox positions are those declared by ecumenical councils, so no. If you want the traditional view of John's gospel, read Eusebius.

    Your holding up of Goodacre's view as the academic/critical position is a whole 'nother question. I have no idea on what he bases his assertion regarding the general view of the gospel throughout Christian history, though I rather suspect it does not reflect Orthodox views throughout Christian history.
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    tWebber Rushing Jaws's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrawly View Post
    NT scholar Mark Goodacre presented a very brief video on John's use of the synoptics. Goodacre stated that John "creatively embellishes"; "adds new characters and discourses", engaging in "imaginative retelling".

    He goes on to state that throughout much of Christian history GJohn was regarded as a kind of reflection or meditation on the synoptics, which seems to include ahistorical or theological material. OK, so, that seems to be the academic/critical position in a nutshell. Now, I have a question for my Catholic and Orthodox friends:

    Is there an official position on GJohn, or are there a plurality of perspectives on GJohn within Orthodoxy and Catholicism? If there is an official position on GJohn, does it line up with the critical/academic position as laid out by Mark Goodacre?

    Thank you.
    In Roman Catholicism, there is a spectrum of views regarding the Fourth Gospel, from the old-fashioned conservative view that treats it as historical, to the views normal in critical Johannine scholarship, and in more recent types of exegesis.

    Catholics on the Net are often much more conservative than the RCC authorities - it is perfectly acceptable for exegetes to posit than the Johannine discourses of Christ are post-Easter compositions by the Evangelists, rather than the *ipsissima verba* of Christ; but a lot of Catholics donít care for such ideas. Possibly because of the importance of parts of GJohn for dogma and devotion. Until 1955, exegetes had to abide by a series of (provisional) decisions of the Pontifical Biblical Commission, which endorsed a number of positions that were close to those of Fundamentalism. From its founding in 1902 until 1971, the PBC was an expression of the teaching authority of the CC, so those decisions, though not irreformable, enjoyed a fairly high degree of authority and moral weight.

    What exegetes are limited by, are the explicitly doctrinal deliverances of the RCC, insofar as GJohn is affected by them.

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