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Thread: Intimations of Exegesis

  1. #21
    tWebber
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhitney View Post
    one thing I heard ( a long time ago) was that the Jews had formed many expectations or requirements that they expected to be characteristic of the Messiah. So we might expect this of passages such as "out of Egypt I have called my Son" or that "he would be called a Nazarite." I believe that some specific types of miracles were expected of the Messiah -- probably of healing a person who was born blind. The drawback on this stuff I heard ... I don't have the original recording/lecture and I don't have scholarly sources.
    It would be interesting to see if such fulfillments are only in Matthew, as the Jewish-focused gospel. If only in Matthew, we may have rough confirmation of the idea that some of these were expectations by the first century Jewish people. Some investigation would also have to be done as to the degree that OT prophecies are addressed in the other gospels.

  2. #22
    Professor KingsGambit's Avatar
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    Enns wrote a paper on Hosea 11:1 and Matthew's use (or repurposing?) of that verse, which on face value seems acontextual. He used to have it available for free on his website, but the link has expired. The title was Matthew and Hosea: A Response to John Sailhamer. Here's a response by Gregory
    Beale: https://www.etsjets.org/files/JETS-P...-715_Beale.pdf

    On the outset, I will admit I think Enns has the better of this particular argument; that it is too much of a stretch to argue that Matthew's usage of Hosea remains in Hosea's context. My understanding of NT messianic prophecy is similar to that of MM above. This does not exclude the idea that God may have orchestrated some similarities in some cases, which I think is especially likely in the case of Isaiah 53.

    Enns makes a big deal out of this issue in Inspiration and Incarnation, which strikes me as another example of his making a mountain out of what I don't even think is a molehill.
    Last edited by KingsGambit; 06-11-2019 at 07:00 PM.
    For what was given to everyone for the use of all, you have taken for your exclusive use. The earth belongs not to the rich, but to everyone. - Ambrose, 4th century AD

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  3. #23
    tWebber
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    McCartney and Enns ("Matthew and Hosea: A Response to John Sailhamer." WTJ 63 (2001 ) 97-105) note on page 103:
    Hence, Matthew does not quote Hos 11:1 on the occasion of Jesus' return from literal Egypt, but regards it as fulfilled by Jesus' departure from Israel into Egypt. For Matthew, literal Israel has become "Egypt" and the king of literal Israel (Herod) is a new "Pharaoh" that tries to kill the promised deliverer by slaughtering infants, whereas literal Egypt becomes a place of refuge
    However, this reversal of roles would make Hosea 11, as a whole, unreadable. The rejection of such reversal of roles in this instance does not mean that we reject the potential reversal of roles in other passages.

    It seems that the reference to Hosea 11 from Matt 2 would be used to point the reader of the gospel to the events in Hosea 11-14. For Matthew 2 to effectively point out the judgment in Hosea, the Jewish readers would have had to be receptive to the idea that Jesus coming out of Egypt was a bookmark into the similar statement in Hosea 11. This bookmark utilization makes better sense than assuming that the context of Hosea 11 is being interpreted as any clear indicator of the Messiah.
    However, once it is recognized from Malachi and/or Micah, that the Messiah would come with judgments, then Hosea could be read in light of this.

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