Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 41

Thread: The death of another YEC PRATT

  1. #31
    tWebber Leonhard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Denmark - Jutland
    Faith
    Catholic
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    5,595
    Amen (Given)
    981
    Amen (Received)
    2979
    Quote Originally Posted by shunyadragon View Post
    Your jumping all over the place with silly meaningless Star Trek pictures.
    It was one picture, so its 'picture' not 'pictures'

    ALL the various versions still remains a literal interpretation of Genesis, whether 7 days or seven thousand years.
    A literalistic interpretation is pretty much just taking the seven days, as seven days. That's what a literalistic interpretation means, going by the word. So when it says one day, its to be interpreted as one day. All that's needed to refute the Church Fathers being literalistic on the day-age issue, is just to point out the diversity of opinion. Rogue06 has done this, and you've failed to answer him.

    That you're now shifting the goal post by having it encompance their opinions on other subjects of the Bible is irrelevant.

    Yes, St, Augustine
    You use a period between St and the name of the Saint. So it would be 'St. Augustine'

    There was no version that included any concept comparable to evolution.
    What's your point Shuny? I have no problem with the Church Fathers, interpreting the Bible according to the best understanding of nature they had at their time.

  2. #32
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hillsborough, NC
    Faith
    Agnostic
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    14,328
    Amen (Given)
    1563
    Amen (Received)
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by Leonhard View Post
    It was one picture, so its 'picture' not 'pictures'
    This is not the first time this ridiculous picture has been overused.

    A literalistic interpretation is pretty much just taking the seven days, as seven days. That's what a literalistic interpretation means, going by the word. So when it says one day, its to be interpreted as one day. All that's needed to refute the Church Fathers being literalistic on the day-age issue, is just to point out the diversity of opinion. Rogue06 has done this, and you've failed to answer him.

    That you're now shifting the goal post by having it encompance their opinions on other subjects of the Bible is irrelevant.
    No shifting the goal posts at all. The interpretation of a day as a day or a thousand years has a basis in a literal interpretation of Genesis with Biblical references. ALL believed in a literal Biblical world flood.


    You use a period between St and the name of the Saint. So it would be 'St. Augustine'
    A true anal grammarian par excellence.

    What's your point Shuny? I have no problem with the Church Fathers, interpreting the Bible according to the best understanding of nature they had at their time.
    The point is that the fundamentalist literal interpretations of Genesis are grounded in the beliefs of the Church Fathers, and the consistent history of Christianity. The literal interpretation view is not just a recent manifestation of of Protestant Christianity. It is consistent in the history of Christianity.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  3. #33
    tWebber TheLurch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Northeast USA
    Faith
    MYOB
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,390
    Amen (Given)
    91
    Amen (Received)
    570
    Quote Originally Posted by Juvenal View Post
    Wiki: 2I/Borisov

    2I/Borisov, originally designated C/2019 Q4 (Borisov),[8][12] is the first observed interstellar comet[13][6] and the second observed interstellar interloper after ʻOumuamua.[14][15] 2I/Borisov has a heliocentric orbital eccentricity of 3.3 and is not bound to the Sun.[3] The comet will pass through the ecliptic of the Solar System in December 2019, with the closest approach to the Sun at just under 2 au on 8 December 2019.

    So looks like it won't be visible without a telescope.
    My understanding is that you'd need a very high end amateur telescope to see it. But if you're near any observatories, there's a chance they'll do viewings - check your calendar. I'm in NYC, and there's actually an observatory on top of the physics building at Columbia (far IR, but still...), so there might be some place closer than you think.
    "Any sufficiently advanced stupidity is indistinguishable from trolling."

  4. Amen Juvenal amen'd this post.
  5. #34
    radical strawberry
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Faith
    Humanist
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    3,495
    Amen (Given)
    471
    Amen (Received)
    1039

  6. #35
    tWebber
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Maryland
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    6,066
    Amen (Given)
    344
    Amen (Received)
    1655
    Quote Originally Posted by TheLurch View Post
    My understanding is that you'd need a very high end amateur telescope to see it. But if you're near any observatories, there's a chance they'll do viewings - check your calendar. I'm in NYC, and there's actually an observatory on top of the physics building at Columbia (far IR, but still...), so there might be some place closer than you think.
    Yep - peak magnitude looks to be around 15, which puts it out of reach for anything smaller than 10 inches aperture (limiting magnitude around 15.2). And even then, you'd need pristine dark skies and very good eyes to glimpse it.

    But in these times 14(15.7 lm) to 17 (16lm) inch dobs are not uncommon, so you might just look for the local astronomy club to have a viewing. Most such clubs will have at least a few members with scopes big enough to catch it.

    Jim
    He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me."

    "So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets"

  7. Amen TheLurch amen'd this post.
  8. #36
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southeastern U.S. of A.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    53,193
    Amen (Given)
    1128
    Amen (Received)
    19501
    Quote Originally Posted by oxmixmudd View Post
    Yep - peak magnitude looks to be around 15, which puts it out of reach for anything smaller than 10 inches aperture (limiting magnitude around 15.2). And even then, you'd need pristine dark skies and very good eyes to glimpse it.

    But in these times 14(15.7 lm) to 17 (16lm) inch dobs are not uncommon, so you might just look for the local astronomy club to have a viewing. Most such clubs will have at least a few members with scopes big enough to catch it.

    Jim
    And tend to be more than happy to let someone take a look.

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

  9. #37
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hillsborough, NC
    Faith
    Agnostic
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    14,328
    Amen (Given)
    1563
    Amen (Received)
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    And tend to be more than happy to let someone take a look.
    I do not consider the discovery of the two interstellar objects as earth shaking or mysterious as many claim. They have been predicted to exist and it is in recent years that we have the technology to discover them and track them. The first is an interstellar asteroid of unknown origin and is likely a wandering remnant of a diseased solar system. The second is a comet from another star and can likely be traced to the star of origin. There will likely be more discovered.

    Source: https://physicsworld.com/a/interstellar-comet-2i-borisov-comes-from-a-binary-star-13-light-years-away-say-astronomers/



    Interstellar comet 2I/Borisov comes from a binary star 13 light-years away, say astronomers

    Coming into focus: 2I/Borisov appears as a blur of light in this telescope image, but astronomers are learning more about interstellar object every day. (Courtesy: IAU)
    Comet 2I/Borisov, recently confirmed as a visitor from interstellar space, could have its origin in a star system 13 light-years away, say astronomers. Extrapolating from the relatively scant orbital parameters determined so far, and accounting for the gravitational effects of hundreds of nearby stars, astronomers in Poland have projected the comet’s path back in time. They found that, about one million years ago, 2I/Borisov and the double star system Kruger 60 passed within a few light-years of each other at a very low relative velocity. Observations of the comet as it travels through the solar system will improve our understanding of its orbit and allow the astronomers to test their hypothesis more thoroughly.


    Not counting cosmic dust grains found on Earth and captured in space, 2I/Borisov is only the second interstellar object that we know of. The first was the pencil-shaped body named ‘Oumuamua, which was spotted shooting through the solar system in September 2017. ‘Oumuamua caused great excitement when it was first discovered and some astronomers even speculated that it could be some sort of alien spacecraft. While that hypothesis has been discounted, much about this object remains a mystery. It was already heading away from the Sun when it was first spotted, so there was little time for detailed observations. Although some outgassing was inferred from unexpected changes in its orbit, it stubbornly refused to emit anything that could be measured directly.

    This time things are different with 2I/Borisov. Discovered at the end of August 2019, 2I/Borisov is still on the inbound leg of its trajectory, and it will not reach perihelion (its closest approach to the Sun) until early December. This means that astronomers will have a year or so in which to make observations, and some of these will be measurements of the comet’s orbit with a view to determining its origin. In a preprint posted on the arXiv preprint server, Piotr Dybczyński, and colleagues Adam Mickiewicz University and the Space Research Center of the Polish Academy of Sciences report the first such study.

    © Copyright Original Source

    Last edited by shunyadragon; 10-22-2019 at 12:46 PM.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  10. #38
    tWebber
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Maryland
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    6,066
    Amen (Given)
    344
    Amen (Received)
    1655
    Quote Originally Posted by shunyadragon View Post
    I do not consider the discovery of the two interstellar objects as earth shaking or mysterious as many claim. They have been predicted to exist and it is in recent years that we have the technology to discover them and track them. The first is an interstellar asteroid of unknown origin and is likely a wandering remnant of a diseased solar system. The second is a comet from another star and can likely be traced to the star of origin. There will likely be more discovered.

    Source: https://physicsworld.com/a/interstellar-comet-2i-borisov-comes-from-a-binary-star-13-light-years-away-say-astronomers/



    Interstellar comet 2I/Borisov comes from a binary star 13 light-years away, say astronomers

    Coming into focus: 2I/Borisov appears as a blur of light in this telescope image, but astronomers are learning more about interstellar object every day. (Courtesy: IAU)
    Comet 2I/Borisov, recently confirmed as a visitor from interstellar space, could have its origin in a star system 13 light-years away, say astronomers. Extrapolating from the relatively scant orbital parameters determined so far, and accounting for the gravitational effects of hundreds of nearby stars, astronomers in Poland have projected the comet’s path back in time. They found that, about one million years ago, 2I/Borisov and the double star system Kruger 60 passed within a few light-years of each other at a very low relative velocity. Observations of the comet as it travels through the solar system will improve our understanding of its orbit and allow the astronomers to test their hypothesis more thoroughly.


    Not counting cosmic dust grains found on Earth and captured in space, 2I/Borisov is only the second interstellar object that we know of. The first was the pencil-shaped body named ‘Oumuamua, which was spotted shooting through the solar system in September 2017. ‘Oumuamua caused great excitement when it was first discovered and some astronomers even speculated that it could be some sort of alien spacecraft. While that hypothesis has been discounted, much about this object remains a mystery. It was already heading away from the Sun when it was first spotted, so there was little time for detailed observations. Although some outgassing was inferred from unexpected changes in its orbit, it stubbornly refused to emit anything that could be measured directly.

    This time things are different with 2I/Borisov. Discovered at the end of August 2019, 2I/Borisov is still on the inbound leg of its trajectory, and it will not reach perihelion (its closest approach to the Sun) until early December. This means that astronomers will have a year or so in which to make observations, and some of these will be measurements of the comet’s orbit with a view to determining its origin. In a preprint posted on the arXiv preprint server, Piotr Dybczyński, and colleagues Adam Mickiewicz University and the Space Research Center of the Polish Academy of Sciences report the first such study.

    © Copyright Original Source

    Don't underestimate the importance shuny. It gives us a chance to investigate for the first time objects that are provably from outside our solar system that are not stars. The differences or similarities are very informative and will allow some theories to be confirmed and others denied. It is a small sample to be sure, but it is fairly significant as astronomical events go.

    Jim
    He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me."

    "So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets"

  11. #39
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hillsborough, NC
    Faith
    Agnostic
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    14,328
    Amen (Given)
    1563
    Amen (Received)
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by oxmixmudd View Post
    Don't underestimate the importance shuny. It gives us a chance to investigate for the first time objects that are provably from outside our solar system that are not stars. The differences or similarities are very informative and will allow some theories to be confirmed and others denied. It is a small sample to be sure, but it is fairly significant as astronomical events go.

    Jim
    I don't underestimate the importance of these discoveries, because they begin a new age in astronomy concerning extrastellar objects. Based on the observations so far there is nothing really mysterious about these objects. They were predicted, and likely there will be more since the technology is increasing the ability to find them.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  12. #40
    tWebber TheLurch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Northeast USA
    Faith
    MYOB
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,390
    Amen (Given)
    91
    Amen (Received)
    570
    Quote Originally Posted by shunyadragon View Post
    I don't underestimate the importance of these discoveries, because they begin a new age in astronomy concerning extrastellar objects. Based on the observations so far there is nothing really mysterious about these objects. They were predicted, and likely there will be more since the technology is increasing the ability to find them.
    Well, the prediction had been that we'd find exosolar comets. But the first exosolar object we found, 'Oumuamua, was not a comet. And wasn't a typical asteroid either - it was truly bizarre, and people are still arguing over how to interpret it. So, in many ways, it's only now that predictions are really starting to be confirmed.

    Fun 'Oumumua fact: i once fed an interview that mentioned it into automated transcription software, and it popped out as "Oh momma"
    "Any sufficiently advanced stupidity is indistinguishable from trolling."

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •