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Thread: Election results for Virginia and Kentucky

  1. #11
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill the Cat View Post
    Re-elected Northam?? This is the sort of ignorance that I adore about you out of towners...
    What do you mean by 'out of towners.'
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  2. #12
    God, family, chicken! Bill the Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shunyadragon View Post
    What do you mean by 'out of towners.'
    You are not a Virginian.

  3. #13
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill the Cat View Post
    Actually, we in VA suffered from dramatic Democrat gerrymandering in Tidewater and Richmond.
    I believe the reverse is true considering the history racial gerrymandering by Republicans.

    Source: https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/11/virginia-democrats-victory-after-killing-racial-gerrymander.html



    On Tuesday, that Republican lost his seat, one of six that Democrats flipped to capture a majority the House of Delegates. Democratic candidates appear to have won the overall House vote once again–but this time, they gained a 55–45 majority. (They also won over the state Senate, 21–19, which holds elections every four years.) This turn of fortune reveals the impact of fair maps. In 2017, Democrats were severely disadvantaged by a Republican-drawn racial gerrymander that trapped a huge number of black voters in a handful of noncompetitive districts for nearly a decade. By 2019, that gerrymander was dead, killed off by the courts. And its demise has allowed Virginia Democrats to translate their votes into fair representation in the General Assembly, gaining full control of the state government for the first time since 1994.

    Virginia’s gerrymander had its roots in the 2009 election. Republicans swept the state that year, winning both chambers of the Legislature as well as the governorship. (The election presaged the GOP conquest of state legislatures in time for the next redistricting cycle, masterminded by Virginia’s Ed Gillespie.) After the 2010 census, the GOP-controlled General Assembly passed—and Gov. Bob McDonnell approved—maps that divvied up the state on the basis of race. Most minority voters were packed into heavily black Democratic districts; the rest were scattered through predominantly white Republican districts. The House map was the worse of the two, blatantly relying upon “blue sinks” to siphon off votes from districts that might otherwise have proved competitive.

    In 2014, Virginia voters filed a lawsuit alleging that 12 House districts had been drawn along racial lines, in violation of the equal protection clause. Four years later, a federal district court invalidated 11 of the 12 districts, agreeing that they amounted to an unconstitutional racial gerrymander. The court appointed a special master to redraw the illegal districts. But, of course, fixing a handful of districts creates a ripple effect that requires more lines to be redrawn to maintain equal population. The court wound up adopting a remedial map that altered 25 districts, eliminating several safe GOP seats and generating more competitive races. Attorney General Mark Herring declined to appeal the decision, leaving the House to step in—but in June, the Supreme Court ruled that the House lacked standing to represent the state. The new maps won out.

    The problem was illicit redistricting.

    Democrats took full advantage of the level playing field, raking in buckets of cash to finance aggressive campaigns against Republican incumbents. They flipped several key districts that were redrawn this year to clinch their House majority. Democrats also exploited the GOP’s gerrymander rot: Suburban districts have swung left under Donald Trump, leaving Virginia Republicans scrambling to dissociate themselves with the president. These developments translated into a resounding victory for progressives.

    There is very little doubt that Democrats would’ve taken control of the Virginia House in 2017 if Republicans’ racial gerrymander had fallen in time. Tuesday’s blowout demonstrates that there’s no mysterious or insurmountable hurdle that organically prevents Democrats from translating a landslide (in overall votes) into a majority in the General Assembly. The problem was not that Democratic voters tend to cluster in urban regions, as some Republicans have long claimed. The problem was illicit redistricting.

    Now the chief question facing Virginia Democrats is whether they will engage in tit-for-tat gerrymandering after the 2020 census, capitalizing upon their power to entrench Republicans in the minority. (While racial gerrymandering is forbidden, the Supreme Court has declined to prohibit partisan gerrymandering.) In February, the Legislature passed a constitutional amendment that would create a bipartisan commission to draw district lines in the future. But the measure will not take effect unless the incoming Legislature passes it once more and voters approve it. Democratic legislators will soon need to decide if they want to entrench their majority through undemocratic means—or enact reforms that take politics out of Virginia redistricting for good.

    © Copyright Original Source

    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  4. #14
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill the Cat View Post
    You are not a Virginian.
    By your logic only the Native Americans are Virginians.


    I was born in Maryland and lived in both Maryland and Virginia when I was young. Part of my family's tree and flower Nursery was South of Arlington. My sister graduated from University of Richmond.
    Last edited by shunyadragon; 11-06-2019 at 05:48 PM.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  5. #15
    tWebber Mountain Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shunyadragon View Post
    I believe the reverse is true considering the history racial gerrymandering by Republicans.
    Like I told seer, it's only wrong when Republicans do it.
    Some may call me foolish, and some may call me odd
    But I'd rather be a fool in the eyes of man
    Than a fool in the eyes of God


    From "Fools Gold" by Petra

  6. #16
    God, family, chicken! Bill the Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shunyadragon View Post
    I believe the reverse is true considering the history racial gerrymandering by Republicans.

    Source: https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/11/virginia-democrats-victory-after-killing-racial-gerrymander.html



    On Tuesday, that Republican lost his seat, one of six that Democrats flipped to capture a majority the House of Delegates. Democratic candidates appear to have won the overall House vote once again–but this time, they gained a 55–45 majority. (They also won over the state Senate, 21–19, which holds elections every four years.) This turn of fortune reveals the impact of fair maps. In 2017, Democrats were severely disadvantaged by a Republican-drawn racial gerrymander that trapped a huge number of black voters in a handful of noncompetitive districts for nearly a decade. By 2019, that gerrymander was dead, killed off by the courts. And its demise has allowed Virginia Democrats to translate their votes into fair representation in the General Assembly, gaining full control of the state government for the first time since 1994.

    Virginia’s gerrymander had its roots in the 2009 election. Republicans swept the state that year, winning both chambers of the Legislature as well as the governorship. (The election presaged the GOP conquest of state legislatures in time for the next redistricting cycle, masterminded by Virginia’s Ed Gillespie.) After the 2010 census, the GOP-controlled General Assembly passed—and Gov. Bob McDonnell approved—maps that divvied up the state on the basis of race. Most minority voters were packed into heavily black Democratic districts; the rest were scattered through predominantly white Republican districts. The House map was the worse of the two, blatantly relying upon “blue sinks” to siphon off votes from districts that might otherwise have proved competitive.

    In 2014, Virginia voters filed a lawsuit alleging that 12 House districts had been drawn along racial lines, in violation of the equal protection clause. Four years later, a federal district court invalidated 11 of the 12 districts, agreeing that they amounted to an unconstitutional racial gerrymander. The court appointed a special master to redraw the illegal districts. But, of course, fixing a handful of districts creates a ripple effect that requires more lines to be redrawn to maintain equal population. The court wound up adopting a remedial map that altered 25 districts, eliminating several safe GOP seats and generating more competitive races. Attorney General Mark Herring declined to appeal the decision, leaving the House to step in—but in June, the Supreme Court ruled that the House lacked standing to represent the state. The new maps won out.

    The problem was illicit redistricting.

    Democrats took full advantage of the level playing field, raking in buckets of cash to finance aggressive campaigns against Republican incumbents. They flipped several key districts that were redrawn this year to clinch their House majority. Democrats also exploited the GOP’s gerrymander rot: Suburban districts have swung left under Donald Trump, leaving Virginia Republicans scrambling to dissociate themselves with the president. These developments translated into a resounding victory for progressives.

    There is very little doubt that Democrats would’ve taken control of the Virginia House in 2017 if Republicans’ racial gerrymander had fallen in time. Tuesday’s blowout demonstrates that there’s no mysterious or insurmountable hurdle that organically prevents Democrats from translating a landslide (in overall votes) into a majority in the General Assembly. The problem was not that Democratic voters tend to cluster in urban regions, as some Republicans have long claimed. The problem was illicit redistricting.

    Now the chief question facing Virginia Democrats is whether they will engage in tit-for-tat gerrymandering after the 2020 census, capitalizing upon their power to entrench Republicans in the minority. (While racial gerrymandering is forbidden, the Supreme Court has declined to prohibit partisan gerrymandering.) In February, the Legislature passed a constitutional amendment that would create a bipartisan commission to draw district lines in the future. But the measure will not take effect unless the incoming Legislature passes it once more and voters approve it. Democratic legislators will soon need to decide if they want to entrench their majority through undemocratic means—or enact reforms that take politics out of Virginia redistricting for good.

    © Copyright Original Source

    This begs the entire question of the purpose of districts in the first place. They were intended to group like people with like interests and needs together to vote. This was the purpose of districting cities as whole units. That minorities congregated in cities was not the issue, although the Dems used the existing racial tensions to get their own redistricting plan put in place. And as I cited above, this redistricting accounted for almost all of the flipped seats, not any suburban drift to the left. I live in one of those suburban districts that got gerrymandered this year, but our Republican rep won

  7. #17
    God, family, chicken! Bill the Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shunyadragon View Post
    By your logic only the Native Americans are Virginians.


    I was born in Maryland and lived in both Maryland and Virginia when I was young. Part of my family's tree and flower Nursery was South of Arlington. My sister graduated from University of Richmond.
    You do not live here.

  8. #18
    God, family, chicken! Bill the Cat's Avatar
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    The Republicans won the popular vote in Va

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/elect.../state-senate/

    808,633 Democratic votes, 843,652 Republican votes and 112,897 votes for other candidates have been counted statewide for all contested state Senate races


    Without a clear-cut definition of sin, morality becomes a mere argument over the best way to train animals --- Manya the Holy Szin --- The Quintara Marathon ---

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  9. #19
    tWebber shunyadragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Man View Post
    Like I told seer, it's only wrong when Republicans do it.
    When Republicans in North Carolina and Virginia both redistricted areas for isolating predominante black districts from dominantly white Republican Districts to reduce the influence of Blacks in representation in elected office that were rejected by the courts, Yes.
    Glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them? Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, Act III:

    go with the flow the river knows . . .

    Frank

    I do not know, therefore everything is in pencil.

  10. #20
    God, family, chicken! Bill the Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shunyadragon View Post
    When Republicans in North Carolina and Virginia both redistricted areas for isolating predominante black districts from dominantly white Republican Districts to reduce the influence of Blacks in representation in elected office that were rejected by the courts, Yes.
    Well as we can see by the turnout numbers, the Dem redistricting effort swung the pendulum to the other direction, and the representation of the popular vote does not reflect the new makeup of either chamber.

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