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Thread: Feeling Is Not Thinking

  1. #1
    Department Head Apologiaphoenix's Avatar
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    Feeling Is Not Thinking

    Is there a real difference?

    Link

    ----

    Does our little use of wordage make a difference? Let’s plunge into the Deeper Waters and find out.

    Years ago, I heard N.T. Wright on Unbelievable and I don’t remember the show or the context, but I remember very much what he said. I am sure Justin Brierley, the host, had asked him how he feels about a certain topic. Wright responded that it needs to be asked how he thinks because the confusing of thinking and feeling is one of the great problems of Western culture.

    I think he’s quite right and if you watch, you will be amazed how often this happens. One time it really struck me as I began to start noticing it was back in college. In the lobby area once where the students hung out, someone had on the TV some sports talk show. One person at the newsdesk said to another about a recent event in sports, “How do you feel about that?”

    I used to have this happen with Jehovah’s Witnesses when we lived in Knoxville. They would come and visit us and then do something like read a passage of Scripture and say to me “How do you feel about that?” I would usually say something like, “Happy.” “Okay.” “Good.” Then I would say, “I think what you really want to know is what I think about it.”

    What is most concerning about this is that we take our feelings then to be revealers of thoughts just as much as our thinking is. Our feelings can only tell us about our emotional response to such things. It might be an appropriate or inappropriate response and we should think about what our emotions are telling us, but they’re meant to tell us about ourselves. Your emotions cannot tell you about another human being or about God.

    We spend so much time emphasizing our feelings that we don’t really think. It’s understandable that sometimes we act on emotional responses immediately, though it should be a goal to try to avoid this. If we just listen to our emotions over and over though, we become purely reactional beings and will always be reactional beings.

    If we take it too far, we will start to often think our emotions are telling us the truth about God. That can lead to us thinking God is angry with us or doesn’t love us or anything like that. Now I think God cannot not love us and He cannot be angry with us in the way we take anger to be. When we put our emotions at that level, we put them at the center of the universe and more than that, we put ourselves there as well.

    I recommend today you watch the people around you and watch the people on the news or anywhere you see people talking. Watch and see how often thinking and feeling are confused. Once you start seeing it, it’s hard to unsee it.

    In Christ,
    Nick Peters

  2. Amen Cow Poke, LostSheep amen'd this post.
  3. #2
    tWebber
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    I’ve had this problem of overvaluing feelings for as long as I can remember. It has the trap of being appealing, especially as some of the aspects of God are emotionally appealing, like God’s love for us and the great sacrifice Jesus made on the cross. It does however, have the nasty effect of creating blind spots in one’s thinking and also makes a person purely reactive. It’s not a good habit to have.
    3 For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, 4 that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures --1 Corinthians 15:3-4 (borrowed with gratitude from 37818's sig)

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    Department Head Apologiaphoenix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LostSheep View Post
    I’ve had this problem of overvaluing feelings for as long as I can remember. It has the trap of being appealing, especially as some of the aspects of God are emotionally appealing, like God’s love for us and the great sacrifice Jesus made on the cross. It does however, have the nasty effect of creating blind spots in one’s thinking and also makes a person purely reactive. It’s not a good habit to have.
    Thank you, Dinner. Pay no attention to the oven being heated...

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    tWebber Ana Dragule's Avatar
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    I feel that there is some truth to this article.

    (E.g most worship music)
    I am become death...

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    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
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    Anything can be a god to us if we let it. God gave us both reason and emotion. They are tools to be used and governed by us. Like spiritual gifts they come in different forms and sizes and we all have a different mix.

    It's not bad to use our strength but it is foolish to think that the one that we are best at is better than the other. Don't use a drill to cut a board; use the best tool for the job even if it isn't your best tool.

    That's what is wrong. We spent decades worshipping reason. It's only natural that now we seek a new god in emotion. Neither is fit for worship and neither is fit to be a god.

    Use the tools properly and worship only God.

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