Page 1 of 11 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 109

Thread: Black Americans are coming home to the GOP

  1. #1
    See, the Thing is... Cow Poke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Republic of Texas
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    60,424
    Amen (Given)
    13032
    Amen (Received)
    27576

    Black Americans are coming home to the GOP

    Black Americans are coming home to the GOP

    Anecdotally, I'm seeing this in my own area. While my Church congregation pretty well mirrors ethnicity in the community in general, where I do my "missions" stuff in town - I'm clearly a minority.

    I would say that, on average, the people I work with (both ministerial, social services, clients, etc) would be about 80-85% black. Don't know why that is, but it is.

    Some of the blacks who used to be very anti-Trump are not so much anymore.
    Some of the blacks who didn't used to talk about politics are a little more vocal now, and critical of the Democrats.
    Some of the blacks who didn't used to talk about politics are actually speaking well of Trump and the economy.

    “‘Coming Home’ contains truths about the relationship between African-Americans and Donald Trump that will not be reported by the media. Vernon Robinson and Bruce Eberle have broken new ground and explain how this relationship is key to President Trump’s reelection.” — Ken Blackwell, former Ohio secretary of state

    What do Kay Coles James, Ben Carson, Star Parker, Candace Owens, Ken Blackwell, Diamond and Silk, and Alveda King have in common?

    They are bold, compassionate leaders who believe that every person is created equal by God himself. They understand that every human life has infinite value and limitless potential. They have suffered from some sort of discrimination — but are not bitter. Instead, they seek reconciliation, believe in redemption, and work to advance a more just society. They know that hard work, economic freedom, the preservation of the traditional family, and reducing government control are the keys to success.

    And they are black Americans who support the policies of President Trump.
    "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

  2. #2
    tWebber
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,048
    Amen (Given)
    0
    Amen (Received)
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by Cow Poke View Post
    Black Americans are coming home to the GOP

    Anecdotally, I'm seeing this in my own area. While my Church congregation pretty well mirrors ethnicity in the community in general, where I do my "missions" stuff in town - I'm clearly a minority.

    I would say that, on average, the people I work with (both ministerial, social services, clients, etc) would be about 80-85% black. Don't know why that is, but it is.

    Some of the blacks who used to be very anti-Trump are not so much anymore.
    Some of the blacks who didn't used to talk about politics are a little more vocal now, and critical of the Democrats.
    Some of the blacks who didn't used to talk about politics are actually speaking well of Trump and the economy.

    “‘Coming Home’ contains truths about the relationship between African-Americans and Donald Trump that will not be reported by the media. Vernon Robinson and Bruce Eberle have broken new ground and explain how this relationship is key to President Trump’s reelection.” — Ken Blackwell, former Ohio secretary of state

    What do Kay Coles James, Ben Carson, Star Parker, Candace Owens, Ken Blackwell, Diamond and Silk, and Alveda King have in common?

    They are bold, compassionate leaders who believe that every person is created equal by God himself. They understand that every human life has infinite value and limitless potential. They have suffered from some sort of discrimination — but are not bitter. Instead, they seek reconciliation, believe in redemption, and work to advance a more just society. They know that hard work, economic freedom, the preservation of the traditional family, and reducing government control are the keys to success.

    And they are black Americans who support the policies of President Trump.
    Many African Americans are conservative, so it is not surprising that they would eventually be drawn to the political party associated with conservative polical philosophies.

    But the biggest barriers is race, the conservative movement's inability or unwillingness to address or recognize the problems in this country. From the inception, modern conservatism has had a spotty record, William F Buckley and Barry Goldwater, the role of Bob Jones University, historical stance of resistance to civil rights, the difficulty in reconciling personal responsibility with structural injustices, all are barriers to acceptance of Republican candidates.

    "Since when did white nationalism become a bad thing?" shows the work Republicans need to do before conservative blacks can be counted on for an electoral base.

  3. #3
    See, the Thing is... Cow Poke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Republic of Texas
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    60,424
    Amen (Given)
    13032
    Amen (Received)
    27576
    Quote Originally Posted by simplicio View Post
    Many African Americans are conservative, so it is not surprising that they would eventually be drawn to the political party associated with conservative polical philosophies.

    But the biggest barriers is race, the conservative movement's inability or unwillingness to address or recognize the problems in this country. From the inception, modern conservatism has had a spotty record, William F Buckley and Barry Goldwater, the role of Bob Jones University, historical stance of resistance to civil rights, the difficulty in reconciling personal responsibility with structural injustices, all are barriers to acceptance of Republican candidates.

    "Since when did white nationalism become a bad thing?" shows the work Republicans need to do before conservative blacks can be counted on for an electoral base.
    I don't think it's so much that Republicans are "better", but that Democrats are getting further and further left.
    "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

  4. Amen Ronson, Teallaura amen'd this post.
  5. #4
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southeastern U.S. of A.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    56,237
    Amen (Given)
    1178
    Amen (Received)
    20640
    Quote Originally Posted by simplicio View Post
    Many African Americans are conservative, so it is not surprising that they would eventually be drawn to the political party associated with conservative polical philosophies.

    But the biggest barriers is race, the conservative movement's inability or unwillingness to address or recognize the problems in this country. From the inception, modern conservatism has had a spotty record, William F Buckley and Barry Goldwater, the role of Bob Jones University, historical stance of resistance to civil rights, the difficulty in reconciling personal responsibility with structural injustices, all are barriers to acceptance of Republican candidates.

    "Since when did white nationalism become a bad thing?" shows the work Republicans need to do before conservative blacks can be counted on for an electoral base.
    You do realize that it was thanks to the Republicans that the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act were passed and that the opposition came from the Democrats, right?

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

  6. Amen Teallaura amen'd this post.
  7. #5
    tWebber Mountain Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    United States
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    20,043
    Amen (Given)
    6104
    Amen (Received)
    7472
    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    You do realize that it was thanks to the Republicans that the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act were passed and that the opposition came from the Democrats, right?
    It's a fact that the Democrat party has a long history of racism from opposing Lincoln's agenda to free the slaves, to forming the KKK, to Jim Crow, to opposing civil rights, to establishing racist policies like "affirmative action". It baffles me how many black people don't appear to be aware of this.
    Some may call me foolish, and some may call me odd
    But I'd rather be a fool in the eyes of man
    Than a fool in the eyes of God


    From "Fools Gold" by Petra

  8. #6
    tWebber
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,875
    Amen (Given)
    244
    Amen (Received)
    736
    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    You do realize that it was thanks to the Republicans that the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act were passed and that the opposition came from the Democrats, right?
    This is a massive oversimplification to the point it's not really true. In the House, 61% of Democrats voted in favor of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and 80% of Republicans voted for it. In the Senate, 69% of Democrats voted in favor, and 81% of Republicans. (then it went back to the House in which 63% of Democrats voted in favor and 80% of Republicans voted in favor) So while it is true there was more support for it among Republicans than Democrats, it is incorrect to imply the opposition was only from Democrats or that it was only Republicans that passed it.

    This was really more of a regional vote than a partisan one, as representatives (Republican and Democrat) from the northern states overwhelmingly voted yes while representative (Republican and Democrat) from the southern states overwhelmingly voted no. There wasn't a single Southern Republican in the House or Senate that voted yes.

  9. Amen KingsGambit, DivineOb, Jaecp amen'd this post.
  10. #7
    See, the Thing is... Cow Poke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Republic of Texas
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    60,424
    Amen (Given)
    13032
    Amen (Received)
    27576
    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    You do realize that it was thanks to the Republicans that the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act were passed and that the opposition came from the Democrats, right?
    Hence the “coming home”.
    "Neighbor, how long has it been since you’ve had a big, thick, steaming bowl of Wolf Brand Chili?”

  11. #8
    tWebber
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,048
    Amen (Given)
    0
    Amen (Received)
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Man View Post
    It's a fact that the Democrat party has a long history of racism from opposing Lincoln's agenda to free the slaves, to forming the KKK, to Jim Crow, to opposing civil rights, to establishing racist policies like "affirmative action". It baffles me how many black people don't appear to be aware of this.
    Black Americans are very familiar with history of Dems on civil rights, the klan and Jim Crow. And they are familiar with the infamous quotes of men such as Thurmond, Helms, and Russell, who were Dems.

    There were several civil rights bills, the most well known is the civil rights bill of 64. The vote followed geographical lines, not party. The politicians from the south, the old Confederacy, voted almost entirely against the bill.

    Northern Democrats, Mansfield and Humphrey (who gained attention and notoriety for calling for civil rights for all in 48) helped guide the bill through Congress. Democrat President supported it and signed into law. Black Americans are aware of that.

    The Republican Party fielded Goldwater in 64, who championed states rights and opposed the bill. Goldwater did well, capturing several deep south states. The Dems ran campaign ads in the south noting Goldwater's past support of civil rights!

  12. #9
    tWebber
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,048
    Amen (Given)
    0
    Amen (Received)
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    You do realize that it was thanks to the Republicans that the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act were passed and that the opposition came from the Democrats, right?
    Not quite accurate, the southern Republicans did not support the civil rights bills.

    The Conservative movement has its home in the GOP. And it has a spotty record on civil rights. While William F Buckley, the architect of the modern conservative movement, did marginalize the overt racists, he was against integration as a federal policy, and later (he came to accept integration), he had difficulty addressing structural forms of racism.

  13. #10
    tWebber firstfloor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Faith
    invalid value
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    4,762
    Amen (Given)
    23
    Amen (Received)
    449
    “I think God, in creating man, somewhat overestimated his ability.” ― Oscar Wilde
    “You can safely assume you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.” ― Anne Lamott
    “And if there were a God, I think it very unlikely that He would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence” ― Bertrand Russell

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •