Page 2 of 11 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 109

Thread: Black Americans are coming home to the GOP

  1. #11
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southeastern U.S. of A.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    56,167
    Amen (Given)
    1177
    Amen (Received)
    20628
    Quote Originally Posted by Terraceth View Post
    This is a massive oversimplification to the point it's not really true. In the House, 61% of Democrats voted in favor of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and 80% of Republicans voted for it. In the Senate, 69% of Democrats voted in favor, and 81% of Republicans. (then it went back to the House in which 63% of Democrats voted in favor and 80% of Republicans voted in favor) So while it is true there was more support for it among Republicans than Democrats, it is incorrect to imply the opposition was only from Democrats or that it was only Republicans that passed it.

    This was really more of a regional vote than a partisan one, as representatives (Republican and Democrat) from the northern states overwhelmingly voted yes while representative (Republican and Democrat) from the southern states overwhelmingly voted no. There wasn't a single Southern Republican in the House or Senate that voted yes.
    Look at it this way... exactly how many Republicans were involved in the filibusters?

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

  2. Amen Teallaura amen'd this post.
  3. #12
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southeastern U.S. of A.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    56,167
    Amen (Given)
    1177
    Amen (Received)
    20628
    Quote Originally Posted by simplicio View Post
    Not quite accurate, the southern Republicans did not support the civil rights bills.

    The Conservative movement has its home in the GOP. And it has a spotty record on civil rights. While William F Buckley, the architect of the modern conservative movement, did marginalize the overt racists, he was against integration as a federal policy, and later (he came to accept integration), he had difficulty addressing structural forms of racism.
    Back in the late 50s (there were Civil Rights bills passed then as well) through the 60s you would be very hard pressed to find a Southern Republican in national office. In effect you could fit all of them comfortably in a car.

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization that’s not the argument." --Tassman

  4. Amen Cow Poke, Teallaura amen'd this post.
  5. #13
    tWebber
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,048
    Amen (Given)
    0
    Amen (Received)
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    Back in the late 50s (there were Civil Rights bills passed then as well) through the 60s you would be very hard pressed to find a Southern Republican in national office. In effect you could fit all of them comfortably in a car.
    The Republican party did form opposition to Dems in some states, and by the 62 toppled the powerful Lister Hill for Senate. While it was small, it was making inroads, mirroring the inroads the Dems were making among black voters.

    The growing influence of Bob Jones University, with its strong and almost unwavering support of Republicans, also played a role in the era before the rise of the religious right and the Moral Majority.

    The Republicans did not filibuster the Civil rights bills, the Dems did. But many black Americans noted that conservative politics did not force the civil rights through congress, it was progressive politicians who supported civil rights. And it was the moderate and liberal Republicans who pushed hard for civil rights.

    Also, it is significant that the Christian church in America was divided in civil rights. Christian conservatives were silent, absent, or opposed to the civil rights issues.
    Last edited by simplicio; 01-08-2020 at 03:36 AM.

  6. #14
    tWebber
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,048
    Amen (Given)
    0
    Amen (Received)
    82
    Black conservatives have an uneasy home in the Republican Party. We have witnessed the bizarre comments by black conservatives, the NRA was founded to protect freemen from the KKK, the pyramids are grain silos....

    Alveda King is a strong voice for the unborn, but has also made unwelcome comments on white privilege. How many Tweb conservatives can swallow. Alveda stands behind MLK's writings and ideas, not sure how many could accept the ideas from Letter from a Birmingham Jail.

  7. #15
    Professor KingsGambit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Triangle
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    10,865
    Amen (Given)
    1798
    Amen (Received)
    4766
    As for the actual OP, my work is maybe 80-85% black and I definitely haven't seen it as of yet, but I tend to keep to myself anyway...
    "I am not angered that the Moral Majority boys campaign against abortion. I am angry when the same men who say, "Save OUR children" bellow "Build more and bigger bombers." That's right! Blast the children in other nations into eternity, or limbless misery as they lay crippled from "OUR" bombers! This does not jell." - Leonard Ravenhill

  8. #16
    tWebber
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    3,682
    Amen (Given)
    275
    Amen (Received)
    1089
    Quote Originally Posted by KingsGambit View Post
    As for the actual OP, my work is maybe 80-85% black and I definitely haven't seen it as of yet, but I tend to keep to myself anyway...
    People seem to be greatly underestimating the political stigma around Trump, which is why I believe polls about Trump might be wrong. This stigma would be even greater in the black community. You don't openly admit you support such a racist nazi, especially if you're black.
    "I was the CIA director. We lied, we cheated, we stole, it was like... we had entire training courses. It reminds you of the glory of the American experiment." - Mike Pompeo, Secretary of State (source).

  9. #17
    tWebber
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Faith
    Agnostic
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    15,929
    Amen (Given)
    1955
    Amen (Received)
    1603
    Quote Originally Posted by Cow Poke View Post
    Black Americans are coming home to the GOP

    Anecdotally, I'm seeing this in my own area. While my Church congregation pretty well mirrors ethnicity in the community in general, where I do my "missions" stuff in town - I'm clearly a minority.

    I would say that, on average, the people I work with (both ministerial, social services, clients, etc) would be about 80-85% black. Don't know why that is, but it is.

    Some of the blacks who used to be very anti-Trump are not so much anymore.
    Some of the blacks who didn't used to talk about politics are a little more vocal now, and critical of the Democrats.
    Some of the blacks who didn't used to talk about politics are actually speaking well of Trump and the economy.

    “‘Coming Home’ contains truths about the relationship between African-Americans and Donald Trump that will not be reported by the media. Vernon Robinson and Bruce Eberle have broken new ground and explain how this relationship is key to President Trump’s reelection.” — Ken Blackwell, former Ohio secretary of state

    What do Kay Coles James, Ben Carson, Star Parker, Candace Owens, Ken Blackwell, Diamond and Silk, and Alveda King have in common?

    They are bold, compassionate leaders who believe that every person is created equal by God himself. They understand that every human life has infinite value and limitless potential. They have suffered from some sort of discrimination — but are not bitter. Instead, they seek reconciliation, believe in redemption, and work to advance a more just society. They know that hard work, economic freedom, the preservation of the traditional family, and reducing government control are the keys to success.

    And they are black Americans who support the policies of President Trump.
    Wow, when did this happen? According to a 2018 pew research poll only 8% of blacks identified with the republican party in any way.

  10. #18
    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    In my house.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    16,078
    Amen (Given)
    10819
    Amen (Received)
    5969
    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    Back in the late 50s (there were Civil Rights bills passed then as well) through the 60s you would be very hard pressed to find a Southern Republican in national office. In effect you could fit all of them comfortably in a car.
    On a tandem bike, more like...

    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." - Jim Elliot


    "Forgiveness is the way of love." Gary Chapman

    My Personal Blog

    My Novella blog (Current Novella Begins on 7/25/14)

  11. #19
    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    In my house.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    16,078
    Amen (Given)
    10819
    Amen (Received)
    5969
    Quote Originally Posted by seanD View Post
    People seem to be greatly underestimating the political stigma around Trump, which is why I believe polls about Trump might be wrong. This stigma would be even greater in the black community. You don't openly admit you support such a racist nazi, especially if you're black.
    The polls are NOT reliable. It is interesting that micropolls show movement in the normally monolithic black vote but it's impossible to gauge. IF it's a real movement, it's likely large since it's showing up in weighted polls - but it could just as easily be an artifact.

    Social media gives some indication that it's an actual movement, but the polls themselves aren't worth the pixels to display them.

    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." - Jim Elliot


    "Forgiveness is the way of love." Gary Chapman

    My Personal Blog

    My Novella blog (Current Novella Begins on 7/25/14)

  12. #20
    tWebber
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,048
    Amen (Given)
    0
    Amen (Received)
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by Teallaura View Post
    On a tandem bike, more like...
    The Republican Party withered away in the fifties, even in the traditionally Republican north counties. But in 1962, Senator Hill barely squeaked by over the Republican challenger. Hill was powerful and a long serving politician. Hill was a kingpin in Alabama politics. I think I incorrectly said Hill was defeated earlier.

    That tandem bike got awful big in just a few short years. And by 1964, Goldwater won by a landslide. Whites Alabamans voted Republican, black Alabamans did not. One major issue for Alabama voters was the federal Civil rights legislation.

    One key issue in them 62 race for the senate was Hill's ineffectiveness in preventing federal trips to be used to,force integration against the states' democratically chosen policy. A key issue in the 64 presidential race was states rights to enforce segregation.

    So much for the myth of Republicans as the party of civil rights. Civil rights divided the country, and divided each party

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •