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Thread: Black Americans are coming home to the GOP

  1. #21
    tWebber
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    One obstacle to movement of otherwise conservative black Americans is the perceived undercurrent of racism within the party politics of Republicans.

  2. #22
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    Is rep King really outside the mainstream of Republicans or conservatives? (when did white nationalism become a bad thing?).

    One the one hand he seems so far out there, yet each over the top comment draws a wide range of defense, and he gets reelected.

    Has the Republican Party been successful in distancing themselves from King?

  3. #23
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terraceth View Post
    This is a massive oversimplification to the point it's not really true. In the House, 61% of Democrats voted in favor of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and 80% of Republicans voted for it. In the Senate, 69% of Democrats voted in favor, and 81% of Republicans. (then it went back to the House in which 63% of Democrats voted in favor and 80% of Republicans voted in favor) So while it is true there was more support for it among Republicans than Democrats, it is incorrect to imply the opposition was only from Democrats or that it was only Republicans that passed it.

    This was really more of a regional vote than a partisan one, as representatives (Republican and Democrat) from the northern states overwhelmingly voted yes while representative (Republican and Democrat) from the southern states overwhelmingly voted no. There wasn't a single Southern Republican in the House or Senate that voted yes.
    I should have said that most of the opposition came from Democrats instead of making it a blanket statement which would be incorrect. Mea Culpa.

    Anyhow I'm going to repost something from awhile back in order to set the record straight before the historical revisionism leads us too far astray.

    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    You do realize that the Dixiecrats were Democrats not Republicans don't you? They weren't Dixiecans. And most returned to the Democratic Party and remained Democrats their entire lives with a few exceptions.

    It was the Democrats that led the record Senate filibuster in opposition to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Included among the organizers were several prominent and well-known liberal Democrat standard-bearers including Robert Byrd (Senate Majority Leader, President pro tempore of the Senate[1] and former kleagle -- recruiter -- for the KKK who was still publicly using the n-word on national TV as late as 2001), J. William Fulbright (Arkansas Senator and mentor of Bill Clinton), Al Gore Sr. (Tennessee Senator and father of Al Gore Jr. who has been known to lie about his fatherís vote[2]), Sam Ervin (North Carolina Senator of the Watergate hearings fame) and Richard Russell (Georgia Senator and another President pro tempore). A total of 21 Democrat Senators opposed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The party was torn in half over the issue, with a full 40% of House Democrats voting against it.

    OTOH, the Republicans backed the Civil Rights legislation. For example, 82% of Republicans in the Senate and 79% in the House voted for the Civil Rights Act. Similar trends occurred with the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which was supported by 82% of the Republicans in the House, and by 94% of Senate Republicans!

    Concerning the Voting Rights Act the same Democrat standard-bearers took their normal racist stands, this time with Senator Fulbright leading the opposition effort. It took the hard work of Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen and Republican Whip Thomas Kuchel to pass the Civil Rights Act (Dirksen was presented a civil rights accomplishment award for the year by the head of the NAACP in recognition of his efforts). Dirksen was also responsible for breaking the Democrat filibuster of the 1957 Civil Rights Act that was signed by Republican President Dwight Eisenhower. The fact is that if it werenít for the Republicanís overwhelming support, all of these measures would have been defeated.

    In fact, FWIU, of 26 major civil rights votes from 1933 through the 1960ís civil rights era shows that Republicans favored civil rights in approximately 96% of the votes (whereas the Democrats opposed them in 80% of the votes).











    1. Third in the line of succession to the presidency behind the Vice President and Speaker of the House

    2. In a speech on civil rights Al Gore claimed that,

    "My commitment to civil rights is a deeply personal one. I watched my father when he was, a U.S. Senator from Tennessee, take courageous stands for civil rights. He opposed the poll tax in the Ď40s, and supported civil rights in the Ď50s, he supported voting rights in 1963, and was one of two Southern Senators to refuse to sign the hateful Southern Manifesto opposing integration in our schools. He lost his Senate seat because his [sic] stands.Ē

    Apparently, Al Goreís memory is a bit fuzzy. His fatherís civil rights record is a tad less glorious than Al relates. Al Gore Sr. voted AGAINST the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Al Gore Sr. participated in a 74-day filibuster to delay and weaken the legislation. Al Gore Sr. proposed an amendment to the Civil Rights Act that would have kept federal funds flowing to schools that defied court desegregation orders. The measure was defeated by a vote of 74 to 25 with only one Republican voted for it.

    The fact is the party that led opposition to Civil Rights legislation was the Democrats. Sure there were some Republicans but they were pretty much on the sidelines.

    And as Lyndon Johnson (who is now held up as some sort of patron of Civil Rights but actually vehemently opposed such legislation) so delicately put it to two governors on Air Force One after passage of the Civil Rights Act: "I'll have those [n-word] voting Democratic for the next 200 years." LBJ was likely our most racist president since fellow Democrat Woodrow Wilson.

    I'm always still in trouble again

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  4. Amen Teallaura amen'd this post.
  5. #24
    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simplicio View Post
    The Republican Party withered away in the fifties, even in the traditionally Republican north counties. But in 1962, Senator Hill barely squeaked by over the Republican challenger. Hill was powerful and a long serving politician. Hill was a kingpin in Alabama politics. I think I incorrectly said Hill was defeated earlier.

    That tandem bike got awful big in just a few short years. And by 1964, Goldwater won by a landslide. Whites Alabamans voted Republican, black Alabamans did not. One major issue for Alabama voters was the federal Civil rights legislation.

    One key issue in them 62 race for the senate was Hill's ineffectiveness in preventing federal trips to be used to,force integration against the states' democratically chosen policy. A key issue in the 64 presidential race was states rights to enforce segregation.

    So much for the myth of Republicans as the party of civil rights. Civil rights divided the country, and divided each party
    Goldwater did what?! He only won six states - and while he took 69% in Alabama, the areas he lost or performed poorly in are overwhelmingly white while he does much better in areas with large black populations (voter issues may well be at play here).

    This doesn't refute the point - Republicans wouldn't consistently win in the South for another two decades.

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  6. #25
    What's that? lilpixieofterror's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    I should have said that most of the opposition came from Democrats instead of making it a blanket statement which would be incorrect. Mea Culpa.

    Anyhow I'm going to repost something from awhile back in order to set the record straight before the historical revisionism leads us too far astray.


    The fact is the party that led opposition to Civil Rights legislation was the Democrats. Sure there were some Republicans but they were pretty much on the sidelines.

    And as Lyndon Johnson (who is now held up as some sort of patron of Civil Rights but actually vehemently opposed such legislation) so delicately put it to two governors on Air Force One after passage of the Civil Rights Act: "I'll have those [n-word] voting Democratic for the next 200 years." LBJ was likely our most racist president since fellow Democrat Woodrow Wilson.
    Reading parts of the new LBJ biography book series should be enough to convince anyone that LBJ was one of the most racist, sexist, rudest people to sit in the White House. For some reason, democrats donít want to talk about it...
    "The man from the yacht thought he was the first to find England; I thought I was the first to find Europe. I did try to found a heresy of my own; and when I had put the last touches to it, I discovered that it was orthodoxy."
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  7. #26
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilpixieofterror View Post
    Reading parts of the new LBJ biography book series should be enough to convince anyone that LBJ was one of the most racist, sexist, rudest people to sit in the White House. For some reason, democrats donít want to talk about it...
    At the risk of getting Chuck scurrying in here squeaking and squealing about "whataboutism" when you compare what Trump said in the Access Hollywood tape to the things Johnson repeatedly did it pales into near insignificance. Women staffers were repeatedly warned not to enter any elevator with him unless they wanted to be physically assaulted.

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

  8. #27
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simplicio View Post
    Is rep King really outside the mainstream of Republicans or conservatives? (when did white nationalism become a bad thing?).

    One the one hand he seems so far out there, yet each over the top comment draws a wide range of defense, and he gets reelected.

    Has the Republican Party been successful in distancing themselves from King?
    House Republican leaders almost immediately yanked Steve King from the Judiciary and Agriculture Committees whereas House Democrats appointed (rewarded?) Ilhan Omar as a member of the powerful House Committee on Foreign Affairs after some of her remarks.

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

  9. Amen RumTumTugger amen'd this post.
  10. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    I should have said that most of the opposition came from Democrats instead of making it a blanket statement which would be incorrect. Mea Culpa.

    Anyhow I'm going to repost something from awhile back in order to set the record straight before the historical revisionism leads us too far astray.


    The fact is the party that led opposition to Civil Rights legislation was the Democrats. Sure there were some Republicans but they were pretty much on the sidelines.

    And as Lyndon Johnson (who is now held up as some sort of patron of Civil Rights but actually vehemently opposed such legislation) so delicately put it to two governors on Air Force One after passage of the Civil Rights Act: "I'll have those [n-word] voting Democratic for the next 200 years." LBJ was likely our most racist president since fellow Democrat Woodrow Wilson.
    The Dixie-crats, as a result of the republicans "southern strategy" were simply the republicans of today. Johnson, like everyone that grows up in a racist society has racism in them, but unlike the republican party of today Johnson was a champion of civil rights regardless of any inherent racism. Fact is that today, the republicans, mostly for political reasons, have adopted if you will, the racist perspective of the Dixie-crats.

  11. #29
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimL View Post
    The Dixie-crats, as a result of the republicans "southern strategy" were simply the republicans of today. Johnson, like everyone that grows up in a racist society has racism in them, but unlike the republican party of today Johnson was a champion of civil rights regardless of any inherent racism. Fact is that today, the republicans, mostly for political reasons, have adopted if you will, the racist perspective of the Dixie-crats.
    Fact-free rants seem to be the soup du jour for the left these days.

    I'm always still in trouble again

    "You're by far the worst poster on TWeb" and "TWeb's biggest liar" --starlight (the guy who says Stalin was a right-winger)
    "Of course, human life begins at fertilization thatís not the argument." --Tassman

  12. #30
    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimL View Post
    The Dixie-crats, as a result of the republicans "southern strategy" were simply the republicans of today. Johnson, like everyone that grows up in a racist society has racism in them, but unlike the republican party of today Johnson was a champion of civil rights regardless of any inherent racism. Fact is that today, the republicans, mostly for political reasons, have adopted if you will, the racist perspective of the Dixie-crats.
    The Dixiecrats were Democrats. Arguably far less prejudiced than their modern Democrat counterparts - at least their policies didn't directly result in the deaths of millions of black babies.

    Better the jackass that tells you to your face that he hates your guts (oddly rare in the actual Dixiecrats) than the slimebag that convinces you to kill your own child.

    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." - Jim Elliot


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  13. Amen seanD amen'd this post.

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