Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: A sword that cuts insect

  1. #1
    Mor
    Guest

    A sword that cuts insect

    Did you hear rumours that in ancient times there were swords that could cut insect? I think this is interesting, because of the material it is made of. Could it be that it is made of stone, a metal oxide. As I know, a metal blade just can't be so sharp. So lets's imagine, it was a very cool stone sword with a beautiful handle. We are only approaching the stone age now, because metals are much easier to tame than stones (saphire, diamonds, countless concretes, countless granites, countless porcelain - they are more countless, than alloys). Also, it is interesting to know more about how plastic materials were used. Even in museums you can find things with plastic handles, such as sickles. Plastics are not very stable materials, so over a short time they degrade to a more stable form of hydrocarbons.

  2. #2
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southeastern U.S. of A.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    35,938
    Amen (Given)
    834
    Amen (Received)
    14543
    It has long been known that many obsidian blades are sharper than steel blades although I don't know if they were used to cut insects

    I'm always still in trouble again

  3. Amen Christianbookworm amen'd this post.
  4. #3
    radical strawberry lao tzu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Everglades
    Faith
    Taoist
    Posts
    2,878
    Amen (Given)
    399
    Amen (Received)
    905
    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    It has long been known that many obsidian blades are sharper than steel blades although I don't know if they were used to cut insects
    And they're also deadly against White Walkers.
    There is no lao tzu

  5. Amen mossrose, One Bad Pig amen'd this post.
  6. #4
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southeastern U.S. of A.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    35,938
    Amen (Given)
    834
    Amen (Received)
    14543
    Quote Originally Posted by lao tzu View Post
    And they're also deadly against White Walkers.
    Dragonglass

    I'm always still in trouble again

  7. #5
    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    In my house.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    12,194
    Amen (Given)
    5520
    Amen (Received)
    4508
    Ancients could shave. Obviously, they had the ability to get a decent edge on a blade. Insects aren't that tough to cut.

  8. #6
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southeastern U.S. of A.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    35,938
    Amen (Given)
    834
    Amen (Received)
    14543
    Quote Originally Posted by Teallaura View Post
    Ancients could shave. Obviously, they had the ability to get a decent edge on a blade. Insects aren't that tough to cut.
    I've seen a bronze shaving razor in a museum a few years back. IIRC it was Egyptian and was somewhere around 2500 years old.

    Getting back to obsidian blades, as this snippet from a CNN article points out they can be quite a bit sharper than your typical steel blade

    Source: How Stone-Age blades are still cutting it in modern surgery


    Obsidian -- a type of volcanic glass -- can produce cutting edges many times finer than even the best steel scalpels.

    At 30 angstroms -- a unit of measurement equal to one hundred millionth of a centimeter -- an obsidian scalpel can rival diamond in the fineness of its edge.

    When you consider that most household razor blades are 300-600 angstroms, obsidian can still cut it with the sharpest materials nano-technology can produce.

    Even today, a small number of surgeons are using an ancient technology to carry out fine incisions that they say heal with minimal scarring.



    Source

    © Copyright Original Source


    I'm always still in trouble again

  9. #7
    Mor
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Teallaura View Post
    Ancients could shave. Obviously, they had the ability to get a decent edge on a blade. Insects aren't that tough to cut.
    I mean, that if an insect flies and meets the blade, it is cut, or the wings are damaged. Or if a piece of paper is falling down on a blade, it is cut by two.

  10. #8
    Evolution is God's ID rogue06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southeastern U.S. of A.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    35,938
    Amen (Given)
    834
    Amen (Received)
    14543
    Quote Originally Posted by Mor View Post
    I mean, that if an insect flies and meets the blade, it is cut, or the wings are damaged. Or if a piece of paper is falling down on a blade, it is cut by two.
    Sounds like some of the legends which surrounded Damascus steel

    I'm always still in trouble again

  11. #9
    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    In my house.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    12,194
    Amen (Given)
    5520
    Amen (Received)
    4508
    Quote Originally Posted by Mor View Post
    I mean, that if an insect flies and meets the blade, it is cut, or the wings are damaged. Or if a piece of paper is falling down on a blade, it is cut by two.
    You're talking about toys. Sure, an obsidian blade or a newly honed blade could be made to do that but neither can hold such an edge making them pointless in combat. The Japanese managed with steel much later but had largely abandoned shields by then. Not sure even a katana could handle constant bashing against flat steel but a bronze sword sure as heck can't against wood.

  12. #10
    tWebber Teallaura's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    In my house.
    Faith
    Christian
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    12,194
    Amen (Given)
    5520
    Amen (Received)
    4508
    Quote Originally Posted by rogue06 View Post
    Sounds like some of the legends which surrounded Damascus steel
    I thought he was talking Bronze Age or earlier?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •